The Leslie Flint Educational Trust

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The 'Laughing' Mollie séance


Recorded: 1965


"The only kind of spirits I was interested in was out of the bottle..."


Leslie Flint, George Woods, Betty Green have a surprise
when the laughing voice of a Scots/Irish woman named Mollie begins to be heard.


She talks of her happiness in the Spirit World
but tells of her lonely, drunken life in Ireland,
yet she does not stop laughing throughout the recording...


After her departure the voice of Dr Charles Marshall explains
that she was brought through as a point of interest, more than for her philosophy. 
 
 

 PLAY                                                                    VOLUME

 

Read the full transcript below, as you listen...


Present: Leslie Flint, George Woods, Betty Greene.

Spirit Communicators: Mollie, Dr Marshall, Mickey.


Woods:
Yes.


Greene:
Come along.


Woods:
Come along.


Mollie:
[Laughing]


Greene:
Yes?


Mollie:
[Laughing]


Greene:
Come along. Somebody laughing...


Woods:
Yes.


Mollie:
[Laughing]


Greene:
Come along friend.


Woods:
[Unintelligible]


Flint:
Oh dear. Whoever's this?


Woods:
Come along friend.


Mollie:
[Laughing] Hello.


Greene:
Do you want to tell us the joke? Hello...


Mollie:
Hello.


Woods:
Hello.


Greene:
Hello friend.


Mollie:
Oh, I’m so happy. [Laughing]


Greene:
Is she laughing or crying?


Woods:
No. Laughing...


Greene:
Laughing?


Woods:
Yes.


Greene:
Having a joke on somebody.


Mollie:
Oh, I’m so happy.


Woods / Greene:
Oh that’s good.


Mollie:
Oh, I’m so happy, to be able to come…[Laughing]


Woods:
Good.


Mollie:
I don't know, I'm sure.


Woods:
Oh we're very pleased for you - to have you, friend, come through.


Mollie:

You’re Mr Woods.


Woods:
Yes.


Mollie:
[Laughing] I've heard all about you…[Laughing]


Mollie:

That’s right.


Greene:
Yes?


Mollie:
Mr Woods and Mrs Greene.


Greene:
That’s right.


Woods:
Yes. That’s quite correct.


Mollie:
I've heard all about you from friends here.


Greene:
Good. Well, can you tell us all about yourself, friend?


Mollie:
Oh if I was to start to tell all about myself...huh, I should be here all night. [Laughing]


Greene:
Can you give us your name please?


Woods:
Please?


Mollie:
My name is Mollie.


Greene:
Mollie?


Woods:
Mollie?


Mollie:
At least that is the name that I was known by. Oh this is most extraordinary, geezus. Oh dear, oh dear, oh dear. Oh dear, oh dear.


Woods:
Come on Mollie. Can you tell us what you’re doing Mollie?


[Sound of whispering]


Mollie:
Oh, things have so changed.


Woods:
Oh yes.


Mollie:
Oh goodness me. You'd hardly recognise things at all.


Woods:
No I don’t think…


Mollie:
Oh, it’s been such a long time since I came back here, oh dear oh dear.


Greene:
Mollie, can you tell us how you passed over and your reactions on passing over?


Mollie:
You mean the way I died?


Greene:
That’s right, yes.


Mollie:
Oh, I just drew me last breath and that was it… [Laughing]


Woods:
What did she say?


Greene:
She just drew her last breath and that was it.


Greene:
Mollie, how did you find yourself, after that last breath?


Mollie:
I died of old age...


Greene:
Mmm...


Mollie:
...and I wasn’t sorry to come here away from things on your side. I had quite a time of it, one way or another. But I had a good time really. [Unintelligible]


Greene:
Where did you...


Woods:
What’s it like on your side Mollie?


Mollie:
Oh it’s very nice, very nice.


Woods:
Could you...just tell us something about it.


Mollie:
I don’t understand this at all, it's just speaking through this box...[Laughing]...I thought it was spirits. [Laughing]


Woods:
Well you're doing very well.


Mollie:
The only kind of spirits I was interested in was out of the bottle...[Laughing]…I used to drink meself...[Laughing]


Greene:
You used to drink a lot, did you?


Mollie:
Ah, I used to drink and drink and drink.


Greene:
Oh dear.


Mollie:
I was a real drinker.


Greene:
Oh, I see.


Mollie:
[Unintelligible]...but I was happy. [Laughing]


Greene:
Where did you live Mollie?


Mollie:
[Unintelligible] You are what they call these Spiritualists.


Greene:
Why yes...


Mollie:
The Father wouldn’t have liked that at all…[Laughing]… He have said you were of the devil...[Laughing]…He would’ve said you were wicked. He would have said you were everything that you shouldn’t have been…[Laughing]…Oh, but he liked his drink...[Laughing]...He could beat me at it…[Laughing]…Oh, I’m so happy here…[Laughing]


Greene:
Jolly good.


Mollie:
I don’t know why I’m here tonight…[Laughing]…Just that I was told about this and I thought I’d just pop my head in and see what it was all about…[Laughing]…So your Spiritualists? Oh dear, oh dear oh dear…[Laughing]…


Greene:

Mollie...


Mollie:
What was that you said?


Greene:
Mollie. Look, can you tell us how you found yourself after you passed over.


Mollie:
I don’t know what you mean how I found myself. I never got lost. [Laughing]


Greene:
Well I mean...


Mollie:
Dear, what a character he was...I was parted from me husband and I was very happy, I had much better time when he was out of it...[Laughing]


Greene:
[Laughing]


Mollie:
Oh dear, oh dear...


Greene:
Now Mollie, can you tell us, what sort of place you found yourself in when you passed over. Did you realise you that you had died?


Mollie:
Oh, I don’t know what I thought...[Unintelligible] was quite happy.


Woods:
[Unintelligible]


Mollie:
I've got a nice little on my own. What was that you said?


Woods:
Can you tell us about the world you're living in - what it's like?


Mollie:
Oh, it’s very nice indeed and most my old friends, a lot of people that I used to know. I have a nice little house. Oh, it’s only a little cottage, but it suits me. I wouldn’t want to come back to your side…[Laughing]…oh dear, oh dear, oh dear, what a…[Laughing]…what a crowd.


Woods:
Were you on the stage Mollie?


Mollie:

Of course, I was not on the stage, what do you think I was, an actress or something?


Woods:
No, I don’t know, were you...


Mollie:
[Laughing]… no I was quite all right in my own way. I kept a few pigs and I had my little holding, I was quite alright as I was, I just made a living but I drank it all…[Laughing]


Greene:
Dear, oh dear.


Woods:
You were a farmer were you Mollie?


Mollie:
What was that? Oh I wouldn't have called…[Laughing]…I wouldn’t call myself a farmer. I had a few pigs...


Woods:
Yes?


Greene:
And I suppose Mollie you were a strict Roman Catholic weren’t you?


Mollie:
No, I wouldn’t say I was strict. Oh, the Father was always on the doorstep pretending to come to save me soul, but he was more interested in the bottle. He always expected a nip.


Woods:
Where did you used to live in when you was on Earth?


Mollie:
[Unintelligible]...it used to cost me a great deal to keep him.


Woods:
Mollie...


Mollie:
What was this you say?


Woods:
Where did you live when you was on Earth, whereabouts...what part did you live, when you were on Earth? What country did you live? Did you in Ireland or England?


Mollie:
In Ireland


Woods / Greene:
Ireland. Oh yes, yes.


Mollie:
But my mother was Scots.


Woods:
Your mother was Scotch?


Mollie:
That’s the funny part about it…[Laughing]…I've never quite known who my father was...[Laughing]


Greene:
Oh, I see. Well Mollie what are you doing now on the other side?


Mollie:
I’m learning how to be a good woman - bit belated.


Flint:
[Laughing]


Woods:
Oh, that is funny.


Mollie:
I’m learning how to be a good woman. It's a bit belated...


Woods:
Yes


Greene:
Oh yes?


Mollie:
...but I’m quite alright. I quite happy.


Greene:
Jolly good.


Molly:
I don’t do anyone any harm - I never did and what I can see of some of the people that I've met here that were supposed to be such goodie-goodies. Oh dear, oh dear. I don’t think they were so good after all.


Greene:
You've seen the true people haven’t you Mollie? You've seen the true people.


Mollie:
You see the real people. You see people [unintelligible] as you never saw them before. But this man, he used to make me smile.


Greene:
Which man?


Mollie:
O’Leary.


Greene:
O’Leary?


Mollie:
Father O’Leary. He was always out to save my soul, but he needed a couple of nips to get going….[Laughter] We had some laughs together too. He was a good man, in his way.


Greene:
Molly who met you when you went over the other side?


Mollie:
My mother.


Greene:
Your mother?


Mollie:
If ever there was a sinner, it was she. But she seems to have done alright for herself. She was not a wicked woman really. She liked the men and the bottle too. [Laughter] But she’s alright. But she was weak, but her heart was of gold. She had a heart of gold.


Greene:
Yes, I bet she did.


Mollie:
...and young Mr Woods...[Laughter]

Woods:
Yes?

Mollie:
I’ve heard all about you…[Laughter]…and I’ve heard about you too Mrs Greene.


Greene:
Have you?


Woods:
Can you tell us something about your world and what it's like Mollie?


Mollie:
Trying to preach. Trying to preach to the preachers...[Laughter]


Greene:
Well we do try and tell them something Mollie...


Mollie:
I know. Oh, you can't tell them anything. They know all the answers...


Woods:
Oh yes Mollie...


Mollie:
They’re have special - they have special privileges. They’ve been taught it all.


Woods:
Yes, you can’t tell them anything.


Mollie:
Doesn’t do to try and tell a parson anything.


Greene:
Mmm...


Woods:
Do you meet many over there?


Mollie:
Oh I’ve met a few. I’ve never had much to do with Protestant parsons in any case, but I think that a lot of them have had to learn again.


Woods:
Yes.


Mollie:
You’re an interesting person you are. You’ve never been to Ireland I suppose?


Woods:
No...


Greene:
I have.


Mollie:
You have? What part have you been?


Greene:
Malahide, near Dublin.


Mollie:
Have you been to Galway?


Greene:
No.


Mollie:
It’s a nice place and County – and Kerry? You not been to Kerry?


Greene:
No, only once Mollie, to Malahide.


Mollie:
I moved about a bit until the last few years of my life, then I got a wee little cottage. Just a little wee place but it was alright and I had a little allowance…[Laughter]


Greene:
Mollie how do you spend your time on the other side, what do you do with yourself?


Mollie:
Oh I’m quite happy, I go to school. [Laughter] Seems so funny when I talk about it, that I go to school. But then again I’m not an old woman anymore, but I'm learning all sorts of things. I’m learning all sorts of things that I would have liked to have learnt in my youth. I got no reading and writing when I was on your side. It was impossible you know, we had no schooling. But here I'm learning all the things that I would have like to have learnt. How to read and how to write and paint and to draw. Oh I'm very happy here. I wouldn't want to change my life for anything.


Greene:
When you got on the other side, did you find that your religious teaching had been…


Mollie:
Well I never took it in…[Laughter]


Greene:
You never took it in…[Laughter]


Mollie:
[Laughter] Oh I had more sense than that...[Laughter]...dear, oh dear...I told you that the father used to come every week, sometimes twice a week. But I’m sure he only came out of his way because he wanted a drink, on a cold night especially...[Laughter]...oh he used to talk to me about it and I used to say, 'yes father, no father, that’s right father'.


Oh but we - we got on alright. He knew that he didn’t say about - didn’t convince me. [Laughter] He used to talk and I used to let him talk.


Greene:
You were very sensible really.


Mollie:
Well, he had his pony and trap you know. He sometimes gave me a ride into town. Here was quite a gay old boy. I think he...[Unintelligible]. I think that was the chief thing.


Woods:
Yes.


Greene:
Have you now got over the drink habit?


Mollie:
Oh I’m not worried about drink now, that's all finished.


Greene:
You have? Good.


Mollie:
My old mother lived with me until she was 80 - 85. She was still as Scots, in spite of us living with us in Ireland for many years, she was as still as Scots as the day she was - I was going to say - she was born. She never got out of the Scots ways, but we were alright. For a short time we lived in Dublin. My husband - that was when my husband was alive - oh but he was a ferryman. I wasn’t sorry to see the back of him, he went off with some other woman. I wasn’t sorry to see the back of him. I had three children.


Greene:
Oh yes?


Mollie:
They never bothered to come and see me, not in the last few years of my life. But it didn’t matter.


Greene:

How long ago was all this Mollie?


Mollie:
Oh must be a hundred years ago now.


Greene:
Oh gosh!


Mollie:
Must be.


Greene:
The children are over your side now then?


Mollie:
Ah, all me people are here. I see them from time to time...[Laughter]…Oh dear, oh dear, oh dear, when I think back to those days...I had a rough time.


Woods:
You must have done, yes terribly rough. And ah, what’s it like over there, Mollie? Could you tell us something about your side of life?


Mollie:
Very nice. It’s very wonderful place to be. It’s a very real place, it's just as real to us as yours is to you - more so.


Woods:
Have you still got...


Mollie:
We have our schools for the young children and those that want to be learned, you know, and we have all sorts of places. I haven’t seen any churches thank God...[Laughter]


Greene:
Good!


Mollie:
Oh dear, and the clergymen that are out of work when they get here…[Laughter]...they have to start working for their living. [Laughter]…and of course not in the same way that you do on Earth, but everyone has to fulfil a place. Of course mind you, there are some very nice men in the church - I shouldn’t say all this should I?


But I was listening to your conversation about your…[Laughter]...about your meeting with all those clergymen...[Laughter]...Ah, you don’t have to tell me, I know, I know…[Laughter]…Oh dear oh dear. They know all answers and talk, talk, talk. Oh you just let them talk and they are happy to hear the sound of their own voice. If you just say, 'yes father' and 'no father' they're quite happy [Laughter]….Oh dear, oh dear, I don’t know I’m sure. I shouldn’t be taking...and what did you say? Oh no, no, no...


Greene:
Oh, I was laughing...[Laughter]...Oh you haven't gone Mollie have you?


Mollie:
No, no, no. I find this very strange, oh dear. I can’t help thinking if I'd have known about this...Of course we used to have the wee folk, you know, we used to have some idea of things, but of course we never believed in communication with spirits, as you call it. Oh father would have been down on us of course he’d been exorcising us all…[Laughter]


Greene:
That wouldn’t have done any good would it?


Mollie:
No. He'd have had his bell and his book and his candle. Oh dear, oh dear.


Greene:
You're thoroughly enjoying yourself aren't you?


Mollie:
I'm very - I find it very amusing coming to speak. Speaking through this thing here, it’s like a - I don’t know what. It’s a very strange affair altogether.


Woods:
It's very interesting, though.


Greene:
Is it the first time you’ve done this Mollie?


Mollie:
Oh I haven’t been back to your side for - must be for, oh how long have I been here now? Oh dear; 1833.


Greene:
Oh gosh!


Molly:
Goodness me. Don’t know how long ago that is. Many years ago, now.


Greene:
Before Queen Victoria.


Mollie:
Who is she?


Greene:
I said, before Queen Victoria.


Mollie:
No I don’t know anything about Queen Victorias.


Woods:
Are you - are you still farming now? Got a little bit of land or something?


Mollie:
No, I have more sense than that. I don't have any farms and things here. I’m not interested in all that.


Woods:
What do you do to occupy your time, Mollie?


Mollie:
Oh, this man does go on…[Laughter] dear oh dear. He keeps asking the same bloody question...dear oh dear oh dear. What an extraordinary man you are.


Woods:
I am very interested Mollie, in what you do and all that you know Mollie, very interesting.


Greene:
Mollie, how are you dressed, what have you got on?


Mollie:
I've got a skirt and a blouse and a - a shawl.

Greene:
Like they use to do...

Mollie:
What did you expect me to come - stark naked?


Woods:
Oh no.


Mollie:
[Laughter] I wonder what it is that people think about us. I suppose they think we're all running around in the baby birthday suits and floating about on clouds and blowing bubbles or something…[Laughter]


Mr Woods:
No, we don’t do that. Mollie.


Mollie:
No? I hope not. [Laughter]


Woods:
No, we don’t do that.


Mollie:
Your quite an interesting man yourself…[Laughter]…you wouldn’t be Irish that I can - no, no, no...


Woods:
My grandmother was though.


Mollie:
Was she now?


Woods:
My grandmother yes...


Mollie:
The most interesting mixture is Irish and Scots let me tell you.


Woods:
...my father came from the Scots. My mother came from the English. So really, I don’t know what I am.


Greene:
Do you know Malahide, Mollie?


Mollie:
What was that you said?


Greene:
Do you know Malahide? Near Dublin.


Mollie:
I’m trying to think. It was such a long time ago since I was there and I haven’t been back since. No, I don’t remember it. Possibly - is it a new place?


Greene:
Oh no, not a new place. It's on the coast, lot of hotels there.


Woods:
Mollie, can you tell us something about what you are doing your side of life?


Mollie:
Oh not again, not again, not again man…[Laughter]…your worse than a - worse than a preacher. Never give you any peace…[Laughter]


Greene:
Mollie is there anything special you would like to tell us, talk to us about?


Mollie:
I have met my husband.


Greene:
You have?


Mollie:
But we don’t - we don’t live together. We didn’t get on at all, at all, you know? We just didn’t hit it off, as you say, no. We didn’t understand each other properly. We were not suited. If he hadn’t got me into the family way I’d never have married him.


Greene:
Oh, I see.


Mollie:
It’s a case of getting married because it was the thing to do; my mother and his people. But we weren’t suited for each other of course. We only lived together just a few years. My mother had a little business. She was very clever with her needle, had a little tiny business you know, made a little bit of money. I was very careful with my money, apart from my bottle.


Greene:
What made you take up the bottle Mollie?


Mollie:
Oh, when you’re away from everything and everybody, when you’re living in a tiny little place, miles from anywhere and your nearest neighbour is several miles, you haven’t got much to do and I used to get me drink. I used to go in the pony and trap sometimes and get what I wanted. I was quite happy to live off the ground. I had my turnips and swedes and things and parsnips. I use to live mostly on vegetables and potatoes of course. We used to make our own, I used to know how to make a very good drink from parsnips and things.


Greene:
Parsnip wine?


Mollie:
Yes. When I was short of something stronger I used to give that to my friends...[Laughter]...I even give it to the father once or twice...[Laughter]...he - he didn’t mind...[Laughter]...so long as it was something. I was rather fond of the father. If he hadn’t been a priest I might have got married to him...[Laughter]...I mean, he wasn’t averse to a little bit of a fun on the quiet and I probably shouldn’t talk about that should I? [Laughter]


Greene:
Well we’re only human Mollie.


Mollie:
Oh it's a long time ago. I shouldn’t be talking about these things, but I suppose since it's a long time ago it can not hurt anyone, doesn’t really matter. All I can say is, that I’m happy here in my own way. My mother she was a good woman too [unintelligible].


Woods:
Carry on talking Mollie we like to...


Greene:
Come on, don’t stop Mollie...


Mollie:
I had two sisters who’ve I’ve met over here.


Greene:
Two sisters?


Mollie:
Annie and Martha. Of course, we’re often together.


Woods:
What are they doing Mollie? Your sisters. Do live with you or do they do something else?


Mollie:
Me moved – we moved to Ireland when I was fourteen, from Scotland.


Greene:
Oh right.


Greene:
Where did you live in Scotland Mollie, can you remember that?


Mollie:
Dundee.


Greene:
Dundee?


Mollie:
Then we - we were in Dublin for a time and then I got married and then I moved out of Dublin. And then I moved again and again, several times, trying to get away from people. Perhaps I shouldn’t talk about it? It’s a long time ago, nobody can worry about that now…I’m happy here…oh dear, oh dear.


Greene:
What do your sisters do with themselves?


Mollie:
Oh one is a teacher of the small, wee - of the children. She teaches the children and the other one, she is in a hospital. But not a hospital quite as you would call it, but a place where people are brought, who are in need of help and attention.


You know, they haven’t been able to sort themselves out and they need comfort and need direction which they can get there, you see and they’re people who need to be - I don’t know what word you’d call it but, gradually help to settle in their new home, you know, environment and that they can’t, sort of, sort themselves out.


Oh but I’ve been learning a great deal here and I’ve been learning such interesting things too. I was always interested in learning but I never had an opportunity when I was on your side, oh dear no. There was no time for schooling in those days.


I remember when I was a wee child we - we had no one to teach us. I never went to school for any length of time, just a few odd weeks here and there, but they weren’t proper schools. I didn’t have much time for that sort of thing.

Oh dear, oh dear. This is a strange thing. I’d heard so much about it and I thought I’d like to find out.


Greene:
Well you’ve done very well.


Mollie:
I don’t understand very much about it - and you’re spiritualists? Oh dear, oh dear.


Greene:
That tickles you doesn’t it?


Mollie:
It does. It tickles me because I feel now that, I'm one myself. [Laughter] Oh dear, not that I was much of one for the church, but my goodness me I should been exorcised or whatever it is they do to people if they know about this...[Laughter]...oh dear, oh dear.


Greene:
You're doing very well Mollie.


Mollie:
The churches. I don’t know...I suppose they mean well. Must give them the benefit of the doubt…[Laughter]…oh dear, oh dear, oh dear. I’ve heard about you...[Laughter]...I’ve heard about you two and about your meetings and about the things that you do and I thought it would be very interesting to come and see for myself. But I don’t think I’ll make a habit of coming back to this sort of thing. I don’t think there’s much point in it myself. I suppose it’s alright if someone’s relations come and talk to them, that’s very nice and very comforting, but I can’t see that I can do much good, I don’t think I can help you.


Greene:

Oh you can Mollie...


Woods:
You can Mollie...


Mollie:
Oh nobody wants to hear me...


Woods:
Yes we do. We'd like to hear you tell us something about you're - what you're doing on that side. We'd be very interested...


Mollie:
Oh not again. You keep on asking me, it's silly. You are a silly old man...


Woods:
Yes, but I like to hear you tell us what you're doing Mollie. If you can tell us...


Greene:
Well she's told us. This is very, very good George, you know.


Woods:
It is. Very good.


Green:
It's very good.


Woods:
Yes.


Woods:
Come on Mollie...


Greene:
...it’s a new angle.


Woods:
Yes.


Mollie:
I like to be – I like to be with all my friends here and we get together and we sing and music. Oh I love the music...


Greene:
You do?

Mollie:
...and I never had much opportunity on your side for music. But here I can go into it seriously and I’ve been to those wonderful concerts and listened to the most wonderful music and it gives me such happiness. I think I get more happiness out of that than anything else.

But you know, although I’ve been telling you about myself when I was on your side and I used to drink, it was because I was lonely and because I was inclined to be depressed and unhappy, you know. But I don’t have to drink here, I don’t want to drink. I’m quite sober here. I don’t drink.


You know, the funny thing is that I've lived in Ireland all those years, but I never lost my Scots accent did I? Huh I know people used to say, 'Ha, you’re not Irish'. I'd say no, I was born in Scotland. My mother was Scots, my father was Irish but - and I've lived most of my life in Ireland - but I like to think that I’m a bit of Scot and a bit of Irish..


Greene:
Oh you are.


Mollie:
...two of the best blends…[Laughter] That’s what the father would say. You can't beat a good Irish whiskey...[Laughter]...oh dear, oh dear. And I'd say well the Scots Whisky has a bit of the Irish, but we have to make do with what we can get, do we not? [Laughter]


Woods:
You are doing very well Mollie, doing very well indeed.


Mollie:
Do you like a drop of Scots or Irish whiskey?


Woods:
No I don’t like it.


Mollie:
It's good for you.


Woods:
Is it, well...


Mollie:
Have a little nip of that every night....


Woods:
I don't like the taste of it Mollie.


Mollie:
...do you the world of good. It don't matter about the taste. You’ll acquire that good quick enough…it'll do you good…[Laughter] People are prejudiced. It’s when you do it to excess that it's bad. All the best clergymen drink.


Woods:
Do they?


Mollie:
Well, what I can be make out of it. [Laughter]


Greene:
Well I wouldn’t be surprised.


Mollie:
There’s nothing wrong with the Church.


Greene:
There’s nothing wrong with it?


Mollie:
Well what I should say there’s nothing wrong with the teachings of Christ.


Woods:
Oh yes. Quite.


Greene:
Oh yes. Definitely not.


Mollie:
But I’m afraid they don’t seem to know very much about what they are talking about...


Woods:
I quite agree with you Mollie.


Mollie:
Christ knew. Christ understood. Perhaps one day I might meet him.


Greene:
Maybe you will.


Mollie:
I don’t know. A lot of people have such strange ideas.


Greene:
Christ was quite an ordinary man Mollie. It's the church that put him on a pedestal.


Woods:
Go on talking Mollie, we like to hear you talk. Right?


Mollie:
I don’t think I can say very much more - I have to go.


Woods:
Well you're doing very well.


Mollie:
I don’t think I shall come and talk to you again.


Greene:
Oh please...


Woods:
Yes. Oh yes.


Mollie:
No. No. You want someone intelligent, someone that can talk to you sensibly about it...


Woods:
No Mollie, we like to hear you...you've done very well indeed.


Mollie:
...but the extraordinary thing is, that when I get like this, it's somehow as if all sorts of ideas and thoughts to do with the past keep coming, you know...


Greene:
Yes.


Mollie:
...and I’d much rather be able to concentrate on things to do with my own life here. But as soon as I get down to your side, it seems that the past does become predominant - is that what you say? You know and…well, you don't want to talk - to listen to all that.

So I should have tried to have concentrated more on things that were important, I assure you. But they always - I understand - that they always say that you should always tell people who you are and what you were and all the rest of it...


Greene:
Quite right.


Mollie:
I shouldn’t have thought that was as important as what you are now. There’s very few people that can come back and say they were anything very much, if they're honest.


Woods:
No.


Mollie:
Seems to me that we all made a lot of mistakes and none of us a very - particularly good. I think it’s the present and the future that matters, not so much the past. Anyway you don't want to talk to me, I must go.


Greene:
Well its been very nice of you to...


Mollie:
I hope - I hope, but I don’t know, perhaps I will come and talk to you again, just for a moment. But I must say, I'm highly amused...oh dear, oh dear...[Laughter]...
I can't help thinking about the old days, as I come here. I think what would the parson or the priest would have thought…oh dear, oh dear, he would have put up his hands in horror and ask for a drink straight away, to get over the shock of it. [Laughter]


Mollie:
Goodbye.


Greene:
Goodbye Mollie. Bless you. Thank you love.


Woods:
Thank you for coming Mollie.


Mollie:
[Laughter] Goodbye and God bless you...oh dear, oh dear, oh dear. It's very nice...[Laughter]...what nice people. But how different everything is...I shouldn't want to be on your side now…oh and the people and everything...[unintelligible]...it's not like it used to be - quiet and peaceful. No no no. No, the world has changed and I wouldn't want to come back to it…oh dear, oh dear...


Mrs Greene:
Oh it was marvellous.


Woods:
[unintelligible]


Greene:
Pardon?


Woods:
It was strange wasn't it?


Greene:
I tell you what is - that was so good.


Woods:
It is good.


Greene:
I'll tell you what...


Marshall:
Actually, really in a sense, perhaps in a sense, there is nothing of great value, there isn't probably anything of real value in what our friend said. But it was done deliberately because of the interesting character and the personality, which will help to show people that even after 100 years a person when contacting Earth again, even for the very first time like that, still has the same sort of personality - it’s a very strong character.


Greene:
Yes.

Marshall:
...and, its done deliberately. Not so much for the value in the communication, but rather that you should have an example of the personality existing even after such a long time. Anyway perhaps she may come again.


Greene:
Is that Dr Marshall?

Marshall:
We want to bring various people who have very strong personalities and characters, so that you have a series of records of interesting characters. Not so much because they were famous, but rather because they’re able to assert their personality and I think it would be of interest to many. Yes it is.


Greene:
Well Dr Marshall that was particularly interesting because when she came back to Earth, she came back into her Earth conditions as a drunk woman and giggled like a drunk woman would.


Marshall:
Yes, well of course, that's association of thought my dear.


Greene:
Yes, that's so good.


Marshall:
You see, as she contacts Earth she, sort of, automatically adjusts and thinks of herself as she was. If you could hear her as she is now, you'd find an entirely different personality and character. It was the asserting, even the unconscious, if you like, assimilation of the old self. But anyway I think you’ll find it interesting. Goodbye. I must go now.


Greene:
Bye bye Dr Marshall.


Woods:
Thank you Dr Marshall.


Mickey:
Goodbye.


Greene:
Bye bye Mickey. Thank you love.


Woods:
Bye Mickey. Thank you very much Mickey.


END OF RECORDING
This transcript was created and kindly provided by Karyn Jarvie.