The Leslie Flint Educational Trust

Promoting the Legacy and Archive of the British Independent Direct Voice Medium Leslie Walter Flint

 
 
 

The Alice Green séance

Recorded: December 18th 1967


“Any book of value is there...”


Mickey shares his good wishes with George Woods
and Betty Greene, in this recording made just before Christmas.

Alice Green then communicates for the first time
and talks about her death, attending her own funeral

and her experience of arriving in the spirit world.

Alice describes the scenery and landscape of this new world
and tells how she was finally reunited with her husband after 40 years.

Then Alice talks about the vast libraries in the spirit world
where, she says, any book of value is available to read...

Finally, an unnamed male communicator gives a Christmas blessing.


Note: This vintage audio has been enhanced and reconstructed from original recordings.

 

Read the transcript below as you listen...


Present: Betty Greene, George Woods, Leslie Flint

Communicators: Mickey, female voice, Alice Green, male voice




Betty Greene:
[The voice on this] tape recording is that of Alice Green. This was recorded on the eighteenth of December 1967, the sitters being Mr S.G.Woods and Mrs B. Green, medium Mr Leslie Flint.



Greene:

Thank you!

Mickey:
And may you have a very, very happy Christmas and a very peaceful and a very successful spiritual new year.


Greene:
Thank you Mickey...


Woods:
Oh thank you, what a lovely present!

Mickey:
And may you... may you have many more years to continue to do the good work.


Greene:
Thank you Mickey...


Woods:
Oh thank you.


Greene:
We would like to...

Mickey:
And don't take any notice of old Flint, about getting old...

[Laughter]


Greene:
...you're as old as you feel aren't you Mickey?


Mickey:
Well, that's the saying, but, um, if you are still of service to somebody or to the work, then you're not really old.


Greene:
No. I suppose not.

Woods:
No. No, that is quite right Mickey. There's a lot of people...


Mickey:

That's what keeps people going, is being of some service and help and being needed, isn't it?


Greene:
Yes.


Woods:
Oh yes.

Mickey:
That's the tragedy of some old people; they feel that nobody wants them.


Woods:
No.

Greene:
Quite right.

Mickey:
Which is terrible. I think everybody should try to make old people feel they are needed.


Greene:
Yes.

Mickey:
And give them things to do - even if they are little things - to make them feel that they are doing something that's helpful, you know.


Greene:
Quite right.

Mickey:
Not just put them away and let them 'go to seed'.


Woods:
No.


Flint: [Coughing]

Woods:
No, that's quite right Mickey. I quite agree with you.


Greene:
The more you have to do, the younger you are.


Flint: [Sniffing]


Woods:
It's best if... if you can do something.


Voice:
Bless the Lord!


Greene:
Hello?

Woods:
Oh hello?
How are you?

Greene:
Good morning, friend.


Woods:
Good morning.

Flint:
Who was that?

Greene:
Don't know.


Woods:
[They said] 'bless the Lord'.


Greene:
A lady?

Woods:
Yes, a lady it was.


Voice:
Bless the Lord...


Woods/Greene:
Yes.

Voice:
...for all his mercies.

Woods/Greene:
Yes.

Voice:
And all his goodness to us.


Woods:
Yes… Very nice of you to come through.

Voice:
May the peace of Christmas be with you now and always.


Greene:
Thank you.

Woods:
Thank you very much.


Greene:
Who's that speaking?

Woods:
Who's speaking, friend?


Greene:
[Unintelligible]

Flint:
Hmm?

Greene:
Slightly familiar, her voice was.


Flint:
Like who?


Greene:
I thought it was...it was slightly familiar, the voice, you know.


Flint:
Sounded to me as if she'd got false teeth! I'm awfully sorry [Laughing]
Aren't I wicked?


Woods:
Well, we're very pleased...


Flint:
I hope not [Laughing] it would be awful; having to go and get new dentures!


Greene: [Laughing]
Leslie!


Flint: [Laughing]


Greene:
I don't know...

Mickey:
Honestly, you can't take him anywhere!

Greene/Flint: [Laughing]

Woods:
Well, it was very nice of her to come through anyway. Who was that?

Greene:

We didn't know who it was.

Woods:
Very pleased.

Flint:
I wonder who she was?


Mickey: [Singing]
# ...in David's city... #
Do you know that one?

Greene:
Yes. Rather! Go on Mickey, carry on.


Woods:
Go on Mickey. I know it.


Mickey: [Singing]
# ...Good King Wencelas looked out, on the feast of Stephen... #


Greene:
Yes, go on...

Mickey: [Singing]
# ...When the snow lay round about, cold and crisp and even... #

Greene:
Yes, go on...


Mickey:
Ha, ha - I can't remember!

Greene:
“Greatly shone the moon that night...”

Mickey:

Oh yes...
#...Greatly - brightly shone the moon that night...# “and the wind was cruel” or something, wasn't it?


Greene: [Singing]
# … When the poor man came in sight ... #


Mickey: [Singing]
# ...Gathering winter fuel! #


Greene:
That's right Mickey, lovely.


Mickey:
I'm not that good at singing.


Greene:
Lovely!
What about 'While shepherds washed...'?

Flint:
[Laughing]

Greene:

I nearly said the other version!


Mickey:
'Shepherds... shepherds watched their sheep by night'?


Greene:

While shepherds washed their socks by night”!


Mickey:
Oh, that's being very naughty.

Greene: [Laughing]
I'm sorry Mickey! Well, that was the schoolgirl version of it.


Mickey:
Honestly, you really are naughty.

Woods:
You are. She is. Quite right Mickey. She is very naughty.


Greene:
Oh dear!


Woods:
“Watched their flocks by night”

Greene:
“Watched their flocks by night”
, yes. I was singing a schoolgirls version of it.

Alice:
That's right.


Woods / Greene:
Hello?

Alice:
Yes, that's right.


Greene:
Yes, friend?


Alice:
“While shepherd watched their flocks by night, all seated on the ground...”


Greene:
Yes, go on.

Alice:
“The angel of the Lord appeared and glory shone around.”

Greene:
That's quite right.


Alice:
That's right.

Woods:
Yes.


Alice:
[We] used to sing that in the old days.


Woods / Greene:

Yes.


Alice:

Well, times have changed since then you know.

Woods:
Oh, yes.

Greene:
They have haven't they?


Alice:
Oh dear, oh dear. I wouldn't want to be on your side now, not for anything. I just wouldn't want to be there.


Greene:
I shouldn't think you would.

Alice:
I'm so happy here.

Greene:
Good.

Alice:
You're Mr Woods.

Woods:
Yes.


Alice:
And you're Mrs Greene.

Greene:
That's right.

Alice:
That's right.

Woods / Greene:
Yes.


Alice:
Yes, I've heard all about you...


Greene:
May we have your name?


Alice:
...
from my friends.


Woods:
Yes.

Alice:
My name, strangely enough, is Green.


Greene:
Oh, is it?

Alice:
But I'm no relation whatsoever to you.

Greene:
Oh.

Alice:
At least, as far as I know I'm not, my dear.


Greene:
No, I don't expect... I mean, it's a pretty common name, Green, isn't it?
What, um, is your Christian name, friend, may we have that?

Alice:
Alice.

Greene:
Alice Green?


Alice:
Yes, that's right. Alice Green.

Greene:
Oh, and where did you live, Alice, when you were on this side?


Alice:
Well, I lived in the East End* for the best part of my life.

*the East End of London

Greene:
Yes.

Alice:
And then we moved down to Margate.


Greene:
Oh, I know Margate.


Alice:
Do you?

Greene:
Yes.


Alice:
Nice place.


Greene:
Yes... And, um, Alice, when you, um... did you know anything about this subject before you passed over?


Alice:
Me?

Greene:
Mmm-hmm.

Alice:
No.


Greene:
You didn't.

Alice:
I had a friend of mine who was a Spiritualist.


Greene:
Yes?

Alice:
Used to try and talk to me about it. I was interested, but I wasn't that interested to go to meetings.


Greene:
No.

Alice:
I was a Baptist.


Greene:
Oh! Yes.


Alice:
Not that I was a good one.

Greene:
No?


Alice:
But I went to them occasionally. My mother and father; they were all religious people.

Greene:
And were you bewildered when you found yourself on the other side?

Alice:
No I was not!

Greene:
You weren't?

Alice:
No. I took it in my stride. I knew there was something. But not quite... you know, I didn't know quite what.

Greene:
Well how did you find yourself - in what sort of conditions did you find yourself?

Alice:
Well after I left the cemetery; that was after my funeral...

Greene:
Oh, you went to your own funeral?

Alice:
...
I went back to my own people, you know. They'd all gone back for a bit of a 'tuck in', you know - like all of them do after a funeral.

*tuck in = eat some food

Greene:
Yes.

Alice:
Of course, they were all talking about me, and I was sitting around there watching them.

Greene:
Oh.


Alice:
And no one took any notice of me and I thought, well, there's not much point in staying here. So, I'm out... I go out, you know.

Greene:
Yes.

Alice:
Up and down the street. No one took any notice. And I thought, well this is a funny 'how-do-you-do'*!

Still, it didn't last long, because I saw my husband coming.

*how-do-you-do = situation

Greene:
Oh.

Alice:
And he'd been dead for...oh, it must have been getting on for forty years.


Greene:
Mmm...

Alice:
He was killed in the First World War. It makes you laugh when you think about it, but I was a bit annoyed with him.


Greene: [Laughing]


Alice:
Well, I'd have thought he'd have come to my funeral. And I thought he'd have been waiting, you know.

Greene:
Yes?

Alice:
Anyway, we soon patched that up.


Greene:
And then what happened?


Alice:
Oh, he just took hold of my hand and he said there's nothing to worry about. I said, 'I'm not worried.' I knew as how there was something after death, but I didn't think that I'd be, sort of, hanging around for long. Anyway, he said there's no need to. The next thing I knew I was sitting in a little place. A nice little place it was - a nice room, a nice pleasant house. And this was his place.


Greene:
Yes.

Alice:

And his mother was there. But I couldn't make out why they hadn't been to my funeral. I... I thought, 'well this is odd', you know.


Greene:
Mmm...


Alice:
I'd have thought they'd have all been there, you know. Anyway, he said that he knew as how I was coming over and it was just as well, you know, at first, that I should get my bearings*. I didn't quite know what he meant by that.


*get my bearings = acclimatise


As I said, 'I thought you'd have been there, you know, when I came over?'
He said, 'Oh no'. He said, 'we just wanted you to have a little experience, so that you could see that you had finished with Earth.

Greene:
Yes. Mmm-hmm.

Alice:
Of course, there was my... my two daughters - they were at the funeral, and their husbands. Oh, I remember one of them wasn't, he couldn't get away, he was working. And there were several of my neighbours; people I'd known. And Barbara was there - that was my little granddaughter.


Oh yes, they all came, but I was so surprised my husband didn't come. Seeing as how he'd been dead all them years, I'd have thought he'd have made a point of being there. But he said I had to learn something and I suppose he was right, you know. I learned, of course, that it was no good hanging around Earth.


Greene:
No.


Alice:
Anyway...


Greene:
Go on, you're awfully interesting. What happened then?

Alice:
Oh, well, we just had a talk and he was telling all about his life and things on his side of life... well, my side now, you see. He said, 'we'll go out for a little walk' and I said 'alright'. Of course, another think I found; I could get about easy.


I'd had a lot of trouble with my legs... oh, shocking! I'd had rheumatics terrible and I couldn't get my shoe on... on my right foot. And to go out walking, I thought, 'well this is marvellous'. No aches, no pains. I walked like I was when I was a girl, you know.

Well, we went out and I was going to put a hat on and I realised I hadn't got one! That was funny thing, wasn't it?


Greene:
Yes [Laughing] And where did you go to?


Alice:
Well, we down this little garden path from the house and... oh, and there were lots of other houses. It was like a suburban house, you know.

Greene:
Yes.

Alice:
There was a lot of other houses - a proper community. And then he said, 'well, we'll go into the town'. I thought, 'well this is funny. Didn't know they had towns when you were dead!'


It was quite a big town - there were no shops, I noticed, but all sorts of buildings and great big places, there was, like art galleries and... like museums I suppose - not that I went in. [They] looked like as if they was...oh, like you see in London, you know, like St Martin-in-the-Fields, and places like that. But there weren't churches.

Greene:
No?


Alice:

I didn't want to... and he said, 'shall we go in here?' and I said, 'oh I don't know.' So I said, 'I'd rather walk around outside.'

Because there was no traffic, people were all walking about, you know, in little groups - and children and there was laughing and there was some music coming from one great place... oh, marvellous music. And he said, 'well, we'll go there sometime, but not now. We want you to get your bearings and get to know places and people.'

And he introduced me to various friends of his and... oh, people that I'd known, some of them, way back, oh, years ago. I'd never have recognised them. And he said, 'this is so-and-so... don't you remember so-and-so?'

Of course, I wouldn't have recognised them. They were so different! I mean, when you come to think about it, you know, time does things to people on Earth, but here they were all young.


Oh, and then we walked further out and we came into what you'd call the country, I suppose, because it was like a country lane. And there was beautiful houses...trees - and no houses, you know. I saw a little place here and there, tucked away. And they were people who, evidently, lived in the countryside and they preferred it.


Oh, it was not unlike being on Earth, without all the... I don't know, the noise and the traffic and all that sort of thing, you know. It was very real and very homely, very nice.

Greene:
Did you find the colours [were] brighter? Or did you find...

Alice:
Oh, yes. The green grass was beautiful and green and, oh, there was lots of colours everywhere, beautiful colours. The colour of the buildings they looked like as if they were made of marble and some looked... well, I don't know what they were made of... it's like... well, like oyster shells, you know. They were all pale pinks and pale mauves and blues and...


Greene:
Lovely.

Alice:
Oh, lovely they was.

Greene:
What were you wearing Alice, when you went on that walk?

Alice:
Oh, now you've asked me! What was I wearing? I haven't an idea what I was wearing. I know I instinctively put out my hand for a hat that wasn't there.


Greene: [Laughing]

Alice:
Because I never would go out without a hat on, you know. And me husband said, 'oh, you don't want to worry about a hat, dear.' Another thing I noticed, that my hair... oh, it was just like I was when I was a girl. Right down my back it was... black as soot, you know, jet black. Lovely black hair I had. Of course, I got old and went grey, you see.


Greene:
Yes.

Alice:
And, of course, I'd had it cut as I got older. Now I've got my beautiful head of hair. Oh, it was beautiful - I was like a young girl I was, skipping along there. I can think back on it now and I can laugh, in a way. Here was me, skipping around - and I'd been, up to that time, you know, hobbling about. [I] couldn't wear one shoe, I had to wear a slipper.


Greene:
What are you doing now Alice, on the other side? How do you...

Alice:
Well, I'm learning, you know, to do various things.


Greene:
Mmm...

Alice:
I'm... well, I don't know how you describe this really. I'm making, um... well, I suppose you'd call them... well, the nearest I can say [sighing]... making things for people's houses. But, um, it sounds silly when I say it, I realise that.


Greene:
What sort of [things]?

Alice:
Decorations and, um... out of materials. I suppose you'd say... well, you can call them curtains, of course. But there again, you don't need curtains. You see, that's what I find so funny - our houses are real and the things in it are real; we have chairs and things and the necessities and yet, there are some things that we don't have, that are missing, that you'd associate with Earth.


But there are lovely materials here and you can make things and decorate and do things to your heart's content. And it isn't just that you can think about it - you have to put some effort behind it. And there are all sorts of yarns and things and materials that you can make up, you know.


Greene:
Are they like the Earth materials?

Alice:
Oh, to look at, yes and they make beautiful designs.

Greene:
Are they?
Is the texture different?

Alice:
Oh, definitely textures and there's things that are grown here that you use for that sort of thing. That's another thing that people don't understand. Although there are animals, they are not used to... well, like they would be on Earth for consumption, you know. And they don't use the wools and things, to make things.


It seems as if there are materials here that come from the natural conditions of life, but they are not, in any way, what you might say, taken from living matter. And yet, of course, everything is living really, but nothing like an animal that would suffer in consequence.


And I've seen lots of animals - whole vast areas of animals, tame animals. Oh, they're so wonderful you know.

Greene:
Lovely, yes. One of the things I'm looking forward to when I...


Flint: [Sniffing]


Greene:
...the animals.

Woods:
Are you still religious on that side, uh...?

Alice:
Oh, not in that way, no. I still like the old music and I'm religious in a sense, but not narrow.

Greene:
No.

Woods:
Do you have churches or anything like that on your side?

Alice:
Oh, I haven't seen a church but I do believe that some people do have churches. No, I think religion is something that you live.


Greene:
Yes. Are you still with your husband?

Alice:
It's something that you feel, you know.


Greene:
Yes. Are you still with your...

Alice:
Oh yes, I'm with him.

Greene:
What does he do over there, Alice?


Alice:
Oh, he spends a lot of time with the garden. He loves his garden, he loves flowers - grows beautiful flowers. But there again, you might almost say that they grow in a natural way, although they do need attention, but you don't seem to get weeds here, you know.

Greene:
Do you pick your flowers?

Alice:
No.


Greene:
You leave them...

Alice:
No, no, we leave them.

Greene:
You're destroying a life when you do that aren't you?

Alice:
Well I suppose, in a kind of way, yes, but you don't feel the need to take them out of the ground, you know. And the ground is very much like [you see] on Earth - soil, you know.


Greene:
Yes. What does your mother-in-law do?

Alice:
Mother-in-law?

Greene:
Well, did you stay with your husband's mother or your own mother, was it?

Alice:
Oh well, I've met my own mother and, of course, I've met my husband's mother and loads of relations I used to know; aunts and all the rest of it and friends.


Greene:
Yes.

Alice:
I don't know. I think if people could get the idea into their head on your side that life here is as natural to us, as yours is to you. And in many respects, it's very similar. But if you can take away from your life - you know, your idea of life here - all the things that are depressing and, you know, all the nasty things, all the things that aren't necessary, you know...

Woods:
Have you the sea there...?

Alice:
...I've never seen it dark here.

Woods:
No?

Alice:
And yet you do feel a form of tiredness. I mean, it's a kind of... I don't know how to explain it.

Greene:
Mental tiredness?

Alice:
I suppose it is a kind of, sort of, mental tiredness and you can rest and one does. But it's not sleep in the same sense as you mean it, you know.

Greene:
No.


Alice:
Oh, I've seen water, large expanses of water. I don't know about sea, as such.

Woods:
No. Have you visited any of the higher...the higher planes at all?

Alice:
No, I'm quite content where I am. That will come later, I suppose.

Greene:
Have you been to any of the, um... halls where you learn...

Alice:
Oh yes, I've been to lots of places. I suppose you'd call them - like libraries …


Greene:
Yes.

Alice:
...and wonderful books and demonstrations. And I've been to places - like what you'd call theatres, where there's concerts and things. And I listen to music and, oh, it's marvellous really.


Greene:
[You have] the pleasure of doing the things that you... you wanted to do while you were on the Earth, now?

Alice:
Yes I am, more or less.

Woods:
What are the libraries like there? Are there any...

Flint: [Sniffing]

Woods:
Could you describe them a little bit please?

Alice:
Could I do what?

Woods:
Describe the libraries.

Greene:
Describe the libraries.


Alice:
Oh well, of course, there, I should think, they've got every book that's worth reading - any book that's of value, you know, it's there. And you can take it down and you can read it. And there again, you see, you don't have to read really. Funny that isn't it? You'd think there wouldn't be any point in having books, would you?

Greene:
You don't have to read?


Alice:
Well, not in the same kind of way.


Greene:
Well how do you assimilate what is in the book?

Alice:
Well, I don't know - it's as if the book speaks to you. They really don't, of course, not really.


Greene:
Can you take the books out of the library and then take them back again?

Alice:
Oh, well there are thousands of duplicates, I suppose you'd say, you know. But, um... oh, yes you can take things home. But it really isn't necessary... that's the funny part about it, when you come to think about it. It's as if there is everything there that you expect, that you would want.


But you soon begin to realise that many of the things are not really necessary, in quite the same sort of way. But if you mentally, sort of, tune in to a particular something or somebody, that you can have communication, automatically.


It isn't as if you have to borrow a book and read it, as such. It's as if you want to know about a book - perhaps a very famous book - you can either read it... but when you begin to realise, that this book can express itself to you.


Don't ask me how it's done, I don't know. But it's as if you can sit there and you can close your eyes and you can hold the book in your hand and all the happenings in the book can be, sort of, shown [to] you, you know.

Yes, it's funny. Don't ask me how it's done because I don't know. So instead of getting, you know, your own idea - which may not be quite what was intended - you can get the identical 'thought impressions' of the author's intention, you know?

Greene:
Yes. Very interesting.

Woods:
The, um... the theatres, are they like the theatres on the Earth?

Alice:
Oh, very much like, yes. Beautiful places, lovely, lovely stages and wonderful plays and wonderful actors and actresses, doing old plays that I remember seeing... some of them, oh, way back when I was on Earth. And they do the old plays and lots of new ones. I've seen all sorts. I was a proper one for the theatre.


Greene:
Were you?

Alice:
Oh, I loved the theatre I did. I remember the old days I used to go [to] the Old Vic and all those places. I used to enjoy them - I didn't always understand them, mind you, but I always liked them. Oh, I remember those days very well.


Woods:
Are there any very large gardens there, you know...?


Alice:
Oh yes, there's great parks, natural parks.


Woods:
And flower gardens?

Alice:
And animals - like zoos I suppose, but not with cages and the animals aren't separated. They're free to roam and they're tame and beautiful. You can stroke them; tigers and so on, you know.


Greene:
Lovely.

Woods:
What are the colours like in the... the atmosphere? Do you have colours in the atmosphere?

Alice:
Oh yes, there's, I suppose you'd call it the sky... well, it is sky really. But I've seen the sky with the most beautiful colours. Marvellous.

Greene:
Have you got music in the atmosphere, Alice? I mean, like...


Alice:

Well, it's there if you want to tune into it, but you don't have to be conscious of it. It's a matter of, um...individual, sort of, wanting to be in tune with it, I suppose - in touch with it.

Greene:
I see, yes.

Alice:
There is a sound... there are sounds, especially when you go out into the, what you would call, the countryside. Because nature has it's own sounds and creates music. And I've been into places where, in the countryside, where the flowers are as tall as trees. And you walk among these flowers and... all the different hues and colours and the beautiful perfume - and the sound that comes from them; music!

Greene:
And the birds?

Alice:
Oh birds! Thousands of birds, beautiful birds. You know, our world is like yours but much better and without all the, you know, the unpleasant side of things. It's perfect. As far as I'm concerned it's perfect anyway.

I've no particular desire to shift or move. People always say that you will. As you progress, of course, you go further afield, but I don't feel the urge. I'm happy as I am, why should I want to change?


Woods:
How do you travel, uh, you know...?

Alice:
Oh, we just walk.


Greene:
Can you go by... say, you think you'd like to go somewhere then you find yourself there?


Alice:
Well, I... I have done that. I have been with people who have gone to other places and it's been via some sort of power of concentration.

Greene:
Yes.

Alice:
You're not conscious of movement as such, it's just that everything around you changes and you're in a different place. But, um... I haven't done much of that. I'm quite content you see. Some people say that one should never be too content, otherwise you don't progress.


Well, I'm content as I am and, of course, eventually I shall progress, no doubt. But I feel, 'well, what is time?' [unintelligible], you know.

Greene:
Time is irrelevant.

Alice:
Oh, I expect your time will come!


Greene: [Laughing]
Oh, I don't think...[unintelligible]


Alice:
I know it's... you know, waiting for it gets, you know... still, [there's] nothing to worry about.


Woods:
Well no.


Alice:
Well, I hope you two have a a very nice happy Christmas.

Greene:
Thank you...


Alice:
And I hope you're peaceful and quiet and, well, you know that power of the Holy Spirit's with you and you'll be surrounded by souls who love you and help you.


Greene:
Thank you...


Woods:
Thank you very much.


Alice:
Anyway, all the very best.


Greene:
May we wish you a happy Christmas?

Alice:
Thank you, although of course we don't have Christmas like you do...

Woods:
No.

Greene:
No. But you know what I mean, a very...

Alice:
That's a man-made thing, ain't it?

Greene:
Yes.

Alice:
Bye-bye.

Greene:
Goodbye Alice and thank you so much.

Woods:
Thank you very, very much Rose.

Greene:
Not Rose: Alice!

Woods:
Oh, I'm sorry.

Flint: [Sniffing]


Greene:[Laughing]
Oh dear!

Woods:
I forgot.

[Break in recording]

Greene:
Yes.


Voice:
Christmas time.

Greene:
Yes.

Voice:
In a sense she's right and in a sense, of course, she's not right. The spirit of Christmas is what really matters.


[Sound of passing traffic]

Christmas has become a strange mixed thing, which is really, in a sense, far removed from the original thought, the original idea. But nevertheless, it is a time which is important and it does bring to many people in your world a great peace and great joy and great happiness. It's a time of goodwill among men.


If only the spirit of Christmas would continue in everyone's life, throughout every day of every year - how different the world would, in consequence, be. But nevertheless, we feel with you, at this time particularly, very enjoined together in the spirit of goodwill.


We endeavour at all times, as you know, to break down the barrier between our world and yours, but at this time there is this condition around Earth which is conducive – particularly to our effort and our work - and it is a great joy to be able to come and speak to you.


We only wish that all humanity understood this great truth. It would make such a difference to their personal lives and the world would change - almost, you might say, overnight - if all humanity understood.

We see the tragedy of your world, we see the sadness that is brought into being through man's stupidity and foolishness. We can only hope and pray that the power of the Holy Spirit will become, more and more, made conscious and aware to humanity.


We do everything we can. We can do no more than try. We are grateful to you for all your effort and all the love and all that you strive to do. We look forward to the coming year, when we hope to have many happy associations such as this and many souls shall come to you.


We give you our love and our blessings and may peace be with you, my friends.

Greene:
Thank you.

Voice:
Farewell.

Woods:
Thank you so much.


Mickey:
Bye-bye. Happy Christmas.


Greene:
Goodbye Mickey, love.

Woods:
Goodbye Mickey.

Mickey:
Bye-bye and happy Christmas.

Greene:
Happy Christmas, love and have a...


Mickey:
And keep your chins up and have a drink on me at Christmas - even if it's only Ribena! Bye-bye.

Greene: [Laughing]

Woods: [Laughing]

Flint: [Laughing]



END OF RECORDING



This transcript was created for the Trust by K.Jackson-Barnes - January 2021