The Leslie Flint Educational Trust

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This photograph is purely a representation of how Nellie Wright might have appeared in life.
It is in fact a photograph of Catherine Booth of the Salvation Army.

The Nellie Wright séance

Recorded: July 11th 1966

In this very clear and amusing audio from 1966,
we hear the voice of Nellie Wright.
A lady who, during her lifetime,
served in the Salvation Army for almost 50 years.


The recording is unique in that Nellie is reluctant to converse with those present at first, since in her mind,
they are all sinners in the Christian sense and must first be saved

by taking Jesus into their lives.


We can hear the utter disbelief and sometimes laughter in the voices of
George Woods, Betty Greene and Leslie Flint himself,
as they respond to Nellie's statements.


She explains how she spends her time helping those in the Next World
who need saving, that she is proud of the Salvation Army
and that she has committed the Bible to memory.


During the seance, Nellie becomes agitated and defensive of her continuing Christian beliefs, that she clearly holds onto, even in the Afterlife...

 
 

PLAY                                                                    VOLUME


Read the full transcript below as you listen...

 


Present: Leslie Flint, Betty Greene, George Woods

Spirit Communicators: Nellie Wright, Dr Charles Marshall, Mickey



Nellie:

Hi?


Woods:

Yes? Come on friend, we can hear you.


Nellie:

You want me to go and talk to them ? What about ?


Flint:

Hmm?


Woods:

Yes ?


Nellie:

They won't want to listen to me.


Woods:

Mmm ? Can’t quite hear what you say, friend.


Flint:

Wonder who that is ? Are you recording this ?


Greene:
Yes.


Nellie:

The gentleman says as how as you'd like to talk to me.


(All at once)
Greene:

Yes I would friend, come along and have a good talk to us.

Woods:
Yes we would very much like to talk to you.

Flint:
Oh lord !

Woods:

Talk to us...


Nellie:

I told the gentlemen that you didn’t think… I didn’t think you would be interested.


Woods:

Oh we’re very interested. Come through friend.


Nellie:

My...


Woods:

What would you like to talk to us about ?


Nellie:

Pardon ?


Woods:

Talk to us.


Nellie:

Pardon ?


Woods:

Talk to us about anything you like, and what are you doing on that side ?


Nellie:

Are you, are you religious ?


Greene:

No.


Woods:

No we’re not religious.


Nellie:

Aren’t you ? I was.


Woods/Greene:

Were you ?

Woods:
Are you religious now ?


Nellie:

Not quite the same, as I used to be, but I used to be very religious in my time.


Greene:

Did you ?


Nellie:

Yes I did. I was in the Army for years and years. My mother - my mother was very interested in religion and I joined the Army when I was 17 and I was with them for oh 50 years, I suppose.


Woods:

Were you really ?


Nellie:

Right from almost the early years I was. My mother, she was Presbyterian.


Greene:

Was she ?

Woods:
And what were you ?


Nellie:

The Salvation Army. I told you. You’re Mr Woods aren’t you, because that’s what the gentleman just told me. He said, go and speak to Mr Woods. I said well who is Mr Woods and he said it was you. You’re a Spiritist aren’t you ?


Woods:

Well, I’m really not anything I’m in research you see.


Nellie:

You’re what ?


Woods:

In the research, I study these things you see.


Nellie:

You don’t look like a research man to me.


Woods:

No I...


Nellie:

Not that I really know quite what they're supposed to look like, but you don’t look [a] scientific sort, do you ?


Woods:

No I’m not.


Nellie:

Have you been religious then ?


Woods:

Well yes but not in, as quite the same as the orthodox religion. I believe...


Nellie:

I don’t think you really know what you are.


Woods:

No...


Flint:

(Laughing)


Nellie:

This your missus ?


Greene:

No, no… I’m not no, I do…I help Mr Woods with his work.


Nellie:

Oh, what does he do for a living then, does he go out to work ?


Woods:

No.


Nellie:

I suppose you’ve got an office and all that I suppose. Oh, got plenty money I suppose.


Woods:

No, no, I spread this truth that’s what I do.


Nellie:

Your religious then.


Woods:

What ?


Nellie:

You’re religious.


Woods:

Well, I don't - you could call it that if you like.


Nellie:

You don’t seem to know what you are, what you’re doing half your time, do you ?


Wood:

Quite right.


Nellie:

Strike me as a bit of a case.


Greene:

Friend, can you give us your name, love ?


Nellie:

Nellie.


Greene:

I beg your pardon.


Nellie:

Nellie Wright


Greene:

Nellie Wright ?


Nellie:

Yes that’s right.

Greene:
Nellie may we...

Nellie:
Used to make a joke of that, you know. I used to say I’m Nellie Wright. They said oh right an' all. I used to go into the pubs I did, you know and sell the 'War Cry' and the 'Young Soldier' and all those things you know. Cause I’m going back now to the twenties and the thirties. I was killed in the Blitz.


Woods:

Oh were you ?

Greene:
Oh, in the last war ?


Nellie:

That’s right.


Greene:

Oh were you really Nellie ?


Nellie:

Yes. I lived in London all my life practically, well I did really excepting for a few odd years I spent out when I got married. That didn’t really work out, he wasn’t a good man. I suppose I shouldn’t say it, but I stuck it to the end.


Woods:

But you’ve done a lot of good work in the Salvation Army.


Nellie:

How do you know ? I didn’t tell you I had.


Woods:

No, but I know the Salvation Army has done a lot of work.


Nellie:

Oh well, whatever people might say about it they do good work you know sir, very good work. They'll go where others won’t go.


Woods/Greene:

Yes.


Nellie:

I always wanted to be a missionary, but I wasn’t - I suppose just wasn’t to be.


Greene:

Nellie ?


Nellie:

I was um… oh, years, you know, in the Army. What was you saying lady ?


Greene:

I was going to ask you Nellie when you was killed in the Blitz, now what were your reactions when you found yourself still alive ? How did you find yourself ?


Nellie:

Oh dear.


Greene:

Can you remember ?


Nellie:

Well I don’t know, I don’t really know. Excepting I saw my dear mother standing there and she was smiling at me and put her arms out towards me.


Greene:

Yes.


Nellie:

I don’t quite - I thought I was dreaming I suppose. Didn’t realise anything dreadful had happened. Didn’t of course even know what had happened. Of course it all happen so quick, one minute I was perfectly alright you might say. The next minute, well, I'd been walking along this street, it was dark you know, the sirens had gone you know, I could hear them up above you know, the planes and that and I thought well the Lord will take care of me and I had faith. Ah...next thing I know I was dead you might say. Still the Lord did take care of me. I have nothing to worry about. I’m happy enough with my people here.


Greene:

But when your mother met you...


Nellie:

But I didn’t know that, hum, all this business of being able to get back and talk to people was - well I heard people talk about it, of course, but I thought it was wicked. Oh, I thought it was terrible, anyone would try to get in touch with the dead. I thought there was only two sorts of dead; the good and the bad. And if you did get in touch, you only got in touch with the bad 'n's, so I steered clear of this sort of thing until just now.
I was - well I'd been thinking about things and of course I see things a bit different, but I’m still not quite sure about it. I suppose it’s got its good side, I can see that, but communication, as you call it, seems an odd thing doesn't it ?
I still can’t get over you; do you say you're, um. What is it you say you are sir ?


Woods:

Oh I study you see, so I can help other people. You see ?


Nellie:

Oh?


Woods:

(unintelligible) the communications and all that, so I can help other people in this work you see.


Greene:

You see Nellie we take these tape recordings.


Nellie:

What, What are they ?


Greene:

Oh well, I’m taking a recording of what you saying now you see.


Nellie:

What ?


Greene:

I’m taking a recording of what you’re saying.


Nellie:

Oh what I’m saying  ? How can you do that then ? You ain't got no gramophone there, have you ?


Greene:

No we’ve got the tape recorders. They weren’t made in your day.


Nellie:

Oh don’t know nothing about them things.


Greene:

Well anyway, everybody can - these tapes go all over the world...


Nellie:

Have you always been a bit touched then ?


Woods:

Beg pardon ?


Nellie:

Have you always been a bit touched ?


Wood/Greene/Flint:

(Laughter)


Woods:
A bit touched, I don’t know about that...


Nellie:

Well I always thought people who were interested in Spiritualist – Spiritualism, as you call it, was a bit touched.


Woods:

Oh did you ? Well anyway...(Laughter)
I don’t feel touched anyway.


Nellie:

Well you look sensible enough. Course, you never can tell.


Flint:

(Laughing)


Woods:

Well no, you're quite right.


Nellie:

What’s he laughing for ? He don't say much that bloke does he ? He just sits there with his mouth shut, half asleep. What does he do for a living ?


Greene:

Well he’s a Medium.


Nellie:

He’s what ?


Greene:

He’s a Medium.


Nellie:

Medium ? He is ?

Greene:
Yes.

Woods:
Could you tell us...

Nellie:
I thought Mediums went into trances and things.


Woods/Green:

No, not all of them.


Nellie:

He looks half daft to me. I don’t know what to make of any of you. If it wasn’t for this other bloke - gentleman here, saying come on though and talk...I don't know what the devil he was on about. Funny business altogether.
What do you want dear ?


Greene:

Listen, when your mother met you where did you go, where did she take you, what did you do ?


Nellie:

I didn’t realise I was dead at first and then it suddenly dawned on me she’d died years ago. And then gradually she explained things to me.
I said, well I don’t understand it, I said I should probably see the General. And she laughed at me, she says 'the General ?' I said yes, the dear old General, you know. She says 'oh, you mean Booth', I said yes of course. So she says, 'oh you’ll probably see him.' I have met him of course, nice chap. Course, he don’t look like he did in them pictures I used to see in the Army Hall, with the big beard and all that, you know. Oh and his dear wife, they were wonderful souls they were, they were what I call real Christians. You know they were real Christians they were.


Woods:

Oh yes they were.


Nellie:

You know, it wouldn’t hurt you to get saved you know.


Woods:

It wouldn’t ?


Nellie:

No. I think you should think about it.


Woods:

Oh yes ?


Nellie:

Come to the Lord, you know. You will be much happier, both of you.


Flint:

Oh dear (Laughs).


Woods:

Tell us about your life on that side.


Greene:

What are you doing Nellie on that side ?


Nellie:

Eh ?


Greene:

What are you doing now ?


Nellie:

I’m doing the Lords work, among the children. Teaching them and helping them, the little ones that come over. And I’m still preaching, course I’m no real preacher, I haven’t had that kind of education. But I can talk to people down in the depths, down in the dark places I go - take the Light and the Truth of the Word I do. I teach them and preach to them, you know.


Greene:

Oh we’re doing the Lord's work too Nellie, because we're…


Nellie:

Oh I don’t think it’s the same.


Greene:

We’re helping people...


Nellie:

I don’t think it’s the same at all.


Greene:

Oh yes, were helping people to know there really is an Afterlife. People don’t know about that.


Nellie:

I think you don’t understand properly, things, you know, you two. I think I ought to try and help you. I think, you know, you should come to the Lord and get saved and then you can start talking to people about things - not until. Because until you’ve been saved you’re in no any position to preach to other people.


Greene:

Saved from what Nellie ?


Nellie:

Eh ?


Greene:

Saved from what ?


Nellie:

From the devil and from evil and all the wicked things that go on. Look at your world today.


Woods:

I know.


Nellie:

You know man has made all that. There’s nobody else as done it, only man himself. God hasn’t done it. God doesn’t interfere, you know. Man’s got his own freedom and if he thinks evil and bad thoughts and that, you get all these things happening. You know you ought to come to the Lord the pair of you - and him in the corner, that you call the Medium.


Flint
Oh dear...

Greene:

(Laughing)


Woods:

Have you met God ?


Nellie:

I don’t say you’re bad people. Don’t misunderstand me and I don’t want to appear rude, but you know you'll never know real joy and happiness until you've come to the Lord. You know he died for us don’t you ?


Woods:

Oh have you met him ?


Nellie:

I haven’t met him. NO, I’m not good enough to meet him yet dear. But one day I shall, but you’ll never meet him unless you accept him you know. You know you must accept the Lord Jesus. If you don’t accept him, your damned forever you know. You'll go down in the pit.


Woods:

Yes ?


Nellie:

You will, you know.


Woods:

Have you been down in the pit to see them ?


Nellie:

No, not exactly in the pit itself, but I’ve been to some of those souls who are, well - they’re not saved you know and I’m trying to help them, so that there's still a chance for them, once they accept the Lord you know. Oh it’s wonderful isn’t it, to be saved ? Course, you wouldn’t know !


Woods:

No of course.


Flint:

(Laughing)


Nellie:

It’s no laughing matter.


Woods:

Have you met any Roman Catholic Spirits ?


Nellie:
Oh, don’t talk to me about them.


Greene:

Ah, but Nellie now that’s not right, you shouldn't be intolerant.


Nellie:

I don’t mean to be, but I think, you know - well I don’t agree with all that Pope business, and all that pomp and all that ceremony and all that. That’s not Christ's is it ? I mean Christ was poor and hadn’t got anywhere to lay his head and all this business of dressing up, like as if they are in the theatre. That’s not religion, that’s not Christianity. Oh no.


Greene:

Christianity Nellie is the way you live and treat other people.


Nellie:

Oh but you’ve got to be saved first, you can’t be a Christian until your saved.


Woods:

How can you be saved, tell me how ?


Nellie:

Well, when you accept the Lord Jesus Christ as your personal saviour and you're washed in the blood and your sins are cast out and you are whiter - whiter than the snow. Do you remember that lovely old hymn we used to all sing together in the Citadel and all that ? Oh we used to have some wonderful evenings. I used to love the meetings you know. Singing [at] the top of our voices we was and we used to go out in the streets and the old harmonium we used to take with us. We used to have some lovely times, but I never could get used to the tambourine, I don’t know why. And I tried and tried and in the end I didn’t bother with it. I always seem to rattle the thing at the wrong moment.


Greene:

But you know Nellie I feel…

Nellie:
What ?

Greene:
I've got to try to disillusion here you a little bit.


Nellie:

What do you mean disillusion me ?


Greene:

Well you see, Jesus wasn’t the only…


Nellie:

I’m here. I should know more than you shouldn’t I ? Your down there.


Greene:

Not necessarily.


Nellie:
You don’t know, you’re not here yet you know.

(Laughter)

Woods:

Could you tell us what your world is like ?


Nellie:

Oh marvellous. Lovely. Beautiful. Beautiful. I still go to the meetings and we still sing our hymns and we all pray together and I go out, I go amongst the little ones and I teach the children, you know we have the – ooh, we have some wonderful times.


Woods:

Have you got a church as well ?


Nellie:

Oh a nice little place I got, a nice little place of my own.

Greene:
Have you ?

Nellie:
Oh yes.


Greene:

Do you live on your own ?


Nellie:

Yes I do.


Woods:

Have you got Salvation Army…?


Nellie:

I’m quite happy on my own. I think it is, when I was on your side, I don’t know, I suppose my marriage was a mess and I'm always - I don’t know. I’m glad to be on my own and I go see people of course.


Greene:

Have you got Salvation Army…?


Nellie:

Funny thing is I never see Fred. Now he was a strange man if ever there was one. He wasn’t a bad man, but he hadn’t got any time for the Army. You know looking back I think - I think about it and I think, I don’t know, why did I ever I get married to him ? But you never can tell. I was in love with him I thought, you know. But we - I don’t know, we drifted apart, you know ?


Greene:

So you’ve still got meeting houses on your sphere Nellie ?


Nellie:

Oh yes.


Greene:

You still have your flags and your banners...?


Nellie;

Oh yes.


Woods:

You play - do you play - have a band and everything like that ?


Nellie:

Oh yes there’s a lovely band.


Greene:

Nellie where did you live in London ?


Nellie:

Hoxton way.

Greene:
Hoxton way ?

Nellie:
I hadn't - of course, mind you, I moved about a bit. I lived in Hackney for quite a number of years.


Greene:

You were living there when you were killed were you ?


Nellie:

Oh no, let me - I got to stop and think now. Such a long time ago, where was I living last ? Was it in M...can’t remember if it was in Mare St...No. I don’t remember, well I think it was, I think it was Hackney was the last - I don’t know. I was - we shifted about a bit then of course there was the...Oh dear, then I went to Liverpool for a number of years, I was in Liverpool.


Greene:

Oh I see. You've been all over the place.


Woods:

Have you met General Booth ?


Nellie:

I told you I haven’t met him yet. I expect I shall...Course he’s risen higher you see, being - I mean, he’s founded the Army you see. I mean he was a man who, well, I mean he was really a God’s gentleman, wasn’t he ? I mean, I expect one day I shall meet him.


Woods:

And do you wear a uniform ?

Greene:
Are you still wearing your uniform ?

Woods:
Your uniform - Salvation Army uniform ?


Nellie:

Cause I’ve met one of the Booth's. Course, you know there’s a lot of them.


Greene:

Yes. You probably met one of the more recent ones. Are you still wearing your uniform Nellie ?


Nellie:

Oh yes.


Greene:

Nice little bonnet and the bow ?


Nellie:

Yes, nice outfit.


Greene:

They’ve changed it somewhat now.


Nellie:

I know there was one boy who used to annoy me something awful. Whenever he saw me coming, course I was getting on a bit then, he’d say 'Here comes Charlie's Aunt.' I expect it was the bonnet you see, you know. Course, when I was much younger I did go occasionally to theatres and things, and I remember that show, what - play, whatever it was, you know. Oh the little devils you know, some of them were. Still, from what I can see of what's going on in your world, they're a darn sight worse than they ever was in my day. Course you know, I think probably people have too much of their own way you know, too much in their pockets. What’s your religion then ?


Woods:

What ?


Nellie:

What’s your religion ?


Woods:

I haven't one Nellie.


Nellie:

Oh you must get a religion.


Woods:

What ?


Nellie:

You must have a religion.


Greene:

Nor have I Nellie.


Nellie:

Oh that’s terrible. That’s terrible, not to have a religion - even if it's Catholic, it's better than nothing.


Greene:

Nellie why should you have a religion when you’re trying to do good for people ?


Nellie:

Oh but you must have a religion.


Greene:

Religion can hold you back.


Nellie:

Oh it didn’t hold me back...

Woods:

Nellie...

Nellie:
...we did a lot of good work too.


Woods:

Nellie, are there other religions in your world ?


Nellie:

Oh I don’t know, I suppose there are - different religions, I don’t see any of them. I’m quite happy with the Army.


Woods:

Are there Church bells ringing in you world ? Have you Church bells ringing on a Sunday ?


Nellie:

I don’t hear no Church bells.


Greene:

No, they don’t in the Army.


Woods:

Do you have Sunday there ? A day of...


Nellie:

Every day’s the Lords day with us, not just one day of the year – week. No, every day, every day, sir. Every day is prayer day, every day is a happy day, every day is Gods day. Ah ! It’s wonderful. You don’t know what you’re missing. But you know, you should join the Army. It’s the best thing. You'll be happy then, much happier than you are now.


Woods:

Oh I – well...er...

Nellie:

You know you're a sinner. You know that don’t you, eh ? You know that don’t you ?


Woods:

That I’m a sinner ?


Nellie:

Yes.

Greene:

Oh Nellie...


Nellie:

Oh, but you are, you’re all sinners...I was a sinner, a shocking sinner I was in my early years, until I was saved.


Woods:

But you’re not now then ?


Greene:
You're saved now ?


Nellie:

Oh no I’m alright now, I wish you two were. But that gentleman here, who came with me, you know he doesn’t agree with me.

Woods:
Who ?

Nellie:
He’s rather like you lot.


Greene:

Is he ?


Nellie:

Yes.


Greene:

Well Nellie it’s awfully kind of you to come and talk to us...


Nellie:

He persuaded me to come today. He says you might be able to help those people. But I don’t quite know, don't seem to be able to do much for you.


Woods:

What ?


Nellie:

You seem obstinate.


Woods:

Oh no we're not...


Nellie:

I think you are sir. I think you are a very obstinate man.


Greene:

Nellie we might be able to help you, you know.


Nellie:

You might what ?


Greene:

Be able to help you.


Nellie:

I’m saved, and that’s more than you are.


Woods:

You’re saved ?


Nellie:

You’re not saved.


Woods:

Yes, but what…


Nellie:

And I’m here and I should know and you are not here yet, so you’re in no position to argue.


Greene:

No but we come over in sleep state, believe me.


Nellie:

Well I won’t say. I don’t wish to be rude to you, because you both seem very nice people, but I think you’re very misguided and I think if you come to the Saviour, you’d be much happier and much better people.


Woods:

Well, have you seen him ?


Nellie:

No, not yet I’m not good enough.


Woods:

Yes but, how do you know he’s there ?


Nellie:

Well he must be here.


Woods/Greene: (Talking over each other)

Why should he...?


Nellie:

But I haven’t reached that...

Woods:
...you haven't seen him ?


Greene:

Why must he be there ?


Woods:

If you haven’t seen him Nellie, how do you know he’s there ?


Nellie:

But if he...he must be.

Woods/Greene:
(Talking over each other)


Nellie:
Now you’re trying to change my er…


Woods:

No I’m not.


Nellie:

You’re naughty, you’re very naughty.


Greene:

Listen Nellie, they preach that you go into the arms of Jesus when you die. When you die…


Nellie:

That’s metaphorical.


Greene

That’s what ?


Nellie:

Metaphorical.


Greene:

I mean nobody has ever seen…


Nellie:

That’s what they say don't they - metaphorical ?

Greene:
Yes.

Nellie:
Well don’t take that literal.


Greene:

Well some people do.


Nellie:

No I don’t...I’m a bit more sensible than some.


Woods:

Did you meet...didn’t Jesus meet you ?
Because that’s what they always tell you, you know, the Salvation Army. That Jesus is going to meet you.


Nellie:

I think you’ve got it all mixed up. I’ve never heard them say in the Army that Jesus is going to meet us.


Woods:

I have.


Nellie:

We might meet Jesus when we’re good enough.


Woods:

But when you going to be good enough Nellie ?


Nellie:

I don’t know. And I wouldn’t presume to know, and it’s not for you to say that.


Woods:

Well I’ve been saying it…


Nellie:

You know, you’re a bit cantankerous aren’t you ?


Woods:

No, no...


Flint:

Oh dear oh dear...(laughing)


Woods:

...just trying to find out things.


Nellie:

Look, if you’re going to make fun of me I shall go away.


Woods:

Nellie, I wouldn’t do that. I’m not trying to make fun of you, I’m trying to find out and I want you to tell me.


Nellie:

Well you’re going a very strange way about it, if I may say so ?


Woods:

No Nellie I’m not. I’m just trying to ask questions. I’m a seeker...

Nellie:

You’re a sinner.

Woods:
Jesus said, 'seek and ye shall find.'


Nellie:

You’re a sinner.


Woods

Oh well, you say...


Nellie:

And you should admit your sins.


Greene:
Oh dear God...

Woods:

What ?


Nellie:

You should admit your sins.


Woods:

What sins ?


Greene:

What sin have we committed Nellie ?


Woods:
What sin...

Nellie:

Well I'm - it’s not for me to tell you what your sins are.


Woods:

Well if we don’t know what sin we’ve committed...


Nellie:

and you must...


Woods/Greene:

We can't put them right.

Woods:
Can we ?

Nellie:

You...


Woods:
If you tell me what sin I've done...

Nellie:
How can you sit there...

Woods:
What ?

Nellie:
...a man of your age and say you haven’t got any sins ?


Woods:

I don’t say that, oh no...


Nellie:

Well you’re implying it.


Woods:

I don’t, I don’t say that. But I want to know a little bit about…


Dr Marshall:

Oh, this friend, as you can...

Greene:
Hello Dr Marshall.

Dr Marshall:
This friend as you can tell, is not very advanced. But she’s a good soul.


Greene:
Yes.


Woods:

Yes I quite agree with you there.


Greene:

It is Doctor Marshall isn’t it ?


Nellie:

What was that he just said ?


Woods:

He said you’re a good soul.

Nellie:

Oh he did, did he ?


Woods:

Yes.

Nellie:
Oh that's alright.


Woods:

Ah, we believe that...and er...


Nellie:

I wouldn’t have come if they hadn’t persuaded me you know.


Woods:

I know but we…


Nellie:

But they said I could do some good work by coming.


Woods:
Yes.

Greene:
Yes you can Nellie.

Woods:
Nellie you...

Greene:
And we shall play your tape to a lot of people.

Woods:
We shall play your tape to a lot of people...

Greene:
even Salvation Army people.

Woods:
...and they'll hear you voice on the tape.


Nellie:

I don’t understand you.

Woods:
no, well...

Nellie:
You’re beyond me


Woods:

Hmm ?


Nellie:

You’re beyond me.


Greene:

Nellie what’s your house like ?


Nellie:

Oh its quite small, suits me. It’s a little tiny place. One up one down.


Greene:

Very nice. Nice little garden ?


Nellie:

Yes, but I haven’t got much time for gardens.


Greene:

I suppose if you’re out all day you haven’t have you ?


Nellie:

I’m not out all day. We don’t have day and night like you do.

Woods:
Have you got a Bible ?


Nellie:
Its permanent day.


Woods:

Do you carry the Bible there ? Nellie.


Nellie:

Do I what ?


Woods:

Have a Bible ?


Nellie:

I don’t, I know it by heart


Woods:

The Bible ?


Nellie:

I don’t, I don’t have to carry any Bibles out about with me. Oh no, you see you don’t know me. I know the Bible from beginning to end, by heart.


Woods:

(Unintelligible)


Greene:

What a wonderful memory.

Woods:
...a wonderful memory.


Nellie:

It's - merely my concentration.


Woods:

Yes


Nellie:

And I go by the Bible. Course I’m more interested in the New Testament, naturally. Cause mind you, I will be honest to admit this, that I don’t necessarily think that everything in the Old Testament can be taken too literally. But erm, the New Testament - and I’ve learned a lot more about the New Testament too. That will surprise you.


Greene:

Oh tell us Nellie, tell us.


Nellie:

Oh goodness me I have. A lot of other chapters that was missing.


Greene:

Oh yes ?


Nellie:

Oh yes. I know them too.


Greene:

What are they about ? Can you tell us ?


Nellie:

One day perhaps I’ll tell you - if you’re interested but I don’t really think you are religious people.


Woods:

Well no, I’m not a religious man, by no means.


Nellie:

And I don’t think you really want to be saved.


Woods:
Oh well, I don’t quite know what you mean by being saved, Nellie.

Greene:
No, I never understand that expression either.


Woods:
If you tell me what you mean by being saved, I...


Nellie:

Being saved.

G
reene:
Yes but Nellie...

Nellie:

Getting rid of all of your sins...


Greene:

What sins have we committed ?


Nellie:

...and being made - made new.


Woods:

Yes well we don’t…


Nellie:

My mother still argues with me, you know.


Greene:

Does she ?

Woods:
Does she ?


Nellie:

Oh she comes to see me from time to time.
She says, 'you know', she says to me, she says, 'you know Nell,' she says, 'you're living in fool's paradise.'

Oh I was so upset. Oh, we had quite a turn over that I tell you. Anyway she still comes. She doesn’t live in the same place as me. She's somewhere else quite different.

Woods:
Are there also...

Nellie:
I particularly don’t want to go there. I don’t think I’d feel happy with those people, I mean she is my mother and all that and I’m fond of her. It’s funny you know, here you’re with people that you like, people that think the same. We're all the same you know, all have the same outlook - its nice, cause were all comfortable and cosy together. There’s no sort of, difference of opinion, it's lovely you know, it's really like heaven. Course I know it ain't yet, 'cause that's to come, later. But I wouldn’t want to live in a place where people were arguing. Especially about religion, oh no.


Greene:

Nellie, haven’t you noticed things are slightly different from the Earth when you were living there ?

Nellie:

Of course they're different in some respects, I realise that. Of course they’re different dear, but we're all saved together. And one day we shall be all caught up together and be with Jesus. Oh it’s lovely. You know, you should be saved sir. You’d feel such a different man. You’ll be new, fresh. You wouldn’t be like you are now - such a mess. (Laughter)
You’d be much better you know.


Woods:

Nellie, are you all Salvation Armyists there ?


Nellie:

Yes we are all of the Army.


Woods:
(Coughing) You are ?


Nellie:

Oh yes and there are others that aren’t Salvationists, but they think much the same as us you know.

Woods:
What the Jehovah's...


Nellie:

Oh you should come to our lovely meetings. We all have such lovely happy times. And we sing and the noise - you know really, sometimes I think to myself, well we’re singing so loud, we're making such a noise. But then we think, well what does it matter ? No one’s going to complain, everybody’s the same thought and idea.
Nice you know isn’t it, when you’re all together in the same environment like that ?


Greene:

Nellie can you sing a bit of that hymn you like so much ?


Nellie:

Oh I don’t know. It's as much as I can do to talk to you girl, without singing hymns.


Greene:
Try and sing a little bit...


Woods:

'We Gather in the Sheaves' - isn't that one of them ?


Nellie:

Thought you didn’t know nothing about it ?


Woods:

Oh yes I’ll listen to you.


Greene:
We'll listen to you, love to.


Woods:
'Gather in the Sheaves'. That’s one what - isn’t it ?


Nellie:

'Wash Me in the Blood of the Lamb'.


Greene:
That's right.

Woods:

Yes that’s another one.


Nellie:

That’s a good one.


Woods:

Yes. All the...


Nellie:

Oh alright, if that’s what you want me to do, I’ll do it, I’ll do it.
Oh it's alright sir, it’s alright. He wants me to come - go away.


Woods:

No I don’t.


Nellie:

No not you.


Woods:

No...


Nellie:

This Gentleman.

Woods:
We'd like to come...

Nellie:
Don’t you want me to stop and talk to them anymore ?


Dr Marshall:

You must come now.


Nellie:

I thought I was trying to help them.

Woods:
Very nice of you to come Nellie.


Nellie:
They’re not saved you know, they not saved.


Woods:

No.

Greene:
Dear oh dear.


Woods:
Dear oh dear.


Nellie:

Poor dears.


Woods:

Oh never mind Nellie.


Greene:

Never mind Nellie. Though, you’ll have to come talk to us again and try and help us.


Dr Marshall:

I have to go.


Greene:

You – are you going Dr Marshall ?


Dr Marshall:

I must take her away, I’m so sorry...


Woods:

It's alright Doctor, we quite understand.

Dr Marshall:
I thought it would be interesting.


Greene:

Will you remember us to Mrs Marshall, Dr Marshall ?


Dr Marshall:

Yes, yes, yes. Can’t stay. Goodbye.


Greene:

Bye bye, thank you very, very much.


Woods:
Goodbye. Thank you.

Mickey:

I have to go. They bought her though as an example.


Greene:

Yes Mickey. As a wonderful example.


Mickey:

It would be interesting for people. Bye Bye.


Greene:

Goodbye Mickey love.

Woods:
Thank you.


Flint:

Goodbye.


This transcript was kindly provided to the Trust by Breanna Esler.