The Leslie Flint Educational Trust

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Annie Nanji séance

Recording 24: November 17th 1981

Between 1970 and 1983, a retired doctor of chemistry, Dr Dinshaw R. Nanji
of Birmingham University, visited Leslie Flint twice a year for private sittings,
travelling from his home in Gothenburg, Sweden.

Each time, he was fortunate to be able to communicate directly with his wife
Annie Ottilia Nanji, who had died in 1966.

In this recording Annie and Dinshaw discuss the London hotels they remember,
future plans for their original home, a unique cemetery in Paris
and their joint plans to produce a book with Neville Randall...
 
 

PLAY                                                                    VOLUME

Read the full transcript below, as you listen...


Present: Leslie Flint, Dinshaw Nanji

Communicators: Mickey, Annie Nanji



Flint:

This séance was recorded on the 17th of November, 1981. Medium Leslie Flint.



Mickey:

Hello


Dinshaw:
Yes?


Mickey:

How are you?


Dinshaw:

Well, I am still going strong.

Mickey:

You don't alter…


Dinshaw:

Yes…


Mickey:

…you, you, you are quite remarkable.


Dinshaw:

Well, we were just talking - I go on and live every day as if it was my last.


Mickey:

Oh, er...you do what?


Dinshaw:

I go on and live every day as if it was my last day.


Mickey:

No..er..well...you...

Dinshaw:

Yeah?


Mickey:
You certainly look well.


Dinshaw:

[Laughs]


Mickey:

Looks as if you’re staying a while then.


Dinshaw:

Huh?


Mickey:

Looks as if you might be staying for quite a while…


Dinshaw:

Hmmm…

Mickey:
…before you come here, I mean.


Dinshaw:

Yes.


Mickey:

But you’re looking forward to coming, aren’t you?


Dinshaw:

Mm-hum…

Mickey:

[Louder] I say, you’re looking forward to coming?


Dinshaw:

Looking what?


Flint:

Mickey said you are looking forward to coming over.


Dinshaw:

Oh, yes! Very much!


Mickey:

Can’t you hear what I say?


Dinshaw:

Beg pardon?


Mickey:

Can’t you hear what I say?


Dinshaw:

Yes…eh…about five.


Mickey:

Are you deaf?


Dinshaw:

Well a little - a little deaf.


Mickey:

Oh.


Dinshaw Nanji:

Yes.

Mickey:

Oh, dear. And you can’t hear what I say?


Dinshaw:

But, you’re not talking loud like my Annie does.


Mickey:

Oh, I think I talk as loud as her.


Dinshaw:

Hmm?


Mickey:

Oh.


Dinshaw:

Yes.

Mickey:

I thought I talked as loud.


Dinshaw Nanji:

[Laughs]


Flint:

[Laughs]


Mickey:

You know, your Annie talks loud.


Dinshaw:

Yes and she knows that I can hear then.


Mickey:

But, you can hear better on the tape.


Dinshaw:

Yes, yes. Of course I can.


Mickey:

Well, I think that’s important.


Dinshaw:

Yes, of course.


Mickey:

'Cause then you can sit at home and you can listen to it.


Dinshaw:

Yes, and do you know, I always have an earphone on the tape recorder. And it goes right in, in, in me then. There's nothing lost.


Mickey:

Course, you’re not getting any younger, are you?


Dinshaw:

Well no, of course not.


Mickey:

What are you, 80?


Dinshaw:

Everybody thinks I am getting younger.


Flint:

[Laughs] Oh dear!


Mickey:

I think you’re quite remarkable for your age.


Dinshaw:

Yeah, they all say that!


Mickey:

You don’t look anything like it; you look at least 20 years younger.


Dinshaw:

[Laughs] That’s exactly what they say!


Mickey:

That’s what the nurses said in hospital.


Dinshaw:

Yes.


Mickey:

I was with you when you went to hospital.


Dinshaw:

Were you?


Mickey:

I came to see you in hospital with, with Annie.


Dinshaw:

None of the...none of the nurses could believe that I was over 80 years. They couldn’t believe it.


Mickey:

Well, you certainly don’t look it.


Dinshaw:

[Laughs]

Mickey:

And you’re pretty upright and all that, and you get around and…


Dinshaw:

Yes, yes.


Mickey:

…and, you, you know you…I think you’re quite remarkable.


Dinshaw:

Well...


Mickey:

And after that operation you made a good recovery.


Dinshaw:

Yes, yes.


Mickey:

Ain’t ya?


Dinshaw:

Yes, of course. And it was a operation where the doctors knew nothing about it.


Mickey:

Why was that?


Dinshaw:

Well you know they have got, developed this new technique of what they call ultra...ultrasound technique. And that was what helped me to spot the exact cause of the trouble. And that was my gallbladder.


Mickey:

And...and...and they shifted it.


Dinshaw:

And they shifted it.


Flint:

Shifted it [Laughs]


Dinshaw:

and then the doctors couldn’t...couldn’t make up their minds.


Mickey:

Anyway, that’s all in the past. You’re all right now.


Dinshaw:

Yes.


Mickey:

Anyway, I must make way for Annie.


Dinshaw:

Yes.


Mickey:

Otherwise, you’ll...oh ne'er mind !


Dinshaw:

Yes.


Flint:

Oh dear! [Laughing]


-


Annie:

Hello darling?


Dinshaw:

Yes darling. I have been so longing for your voice.


Annie:

Can you hear me?


Dinshaw:

Yes, it’s quite nice.


Annie:

No, no. Can you hear?


Dinshaw:

Yep.


Annie:

I wanted to know if you could hear me.


Dinshaw:

Oh, yes. I can hear you dear.


Annie:

Only I am not quite sure, you know…


Dinshaw:

No, no.

Annie:

…if you can hear what I say...


Dinshaw:

Oh, yes! I can hear you perfectly now.


Annie:

...because I have to shout…


Dinshaw:

Yes.


Annie:

…a little, you know…


Dinshaw:

Yes.


Annie:

…because the little boy tell me you don’t hear him.


Dinshaw:

Yes.


Annie:

So, I must try and speak loud.


Dinshaw:

Yes. That’s right.


Annie:

Hello?


Dinshaw:

Hello darling.


Annie:

Well darling, I don’t have to tell you…


Dinshaw:

Yes. 


Annie:

…I am with you all the time.


Dinshaw:

I know that darling, I know.


Annie:

Every day, you know…

Dinshaw:

Yes.

Annie:

…I come to you and I only wish you could remember, during your sleep when you are with me.


Dinshaw:

Yes.

Annie:

But you don’t remember, huh?


Dinshaw:

Oh, yes, I do!


Annie:

You do?


Dinshaw:

Oh, yes.


Annie:

Ah, good.


Dinshaw:

Yes, I do.


Annie:

Only sometimes I think, you know, if only you could remember when you wake up, you know…


Dinshaw:

Oh, yes.


Annie:

…how we have been together.


Dinshaw:

Yes.


Annie:

Hello?


Dinshaw:

Hello darling!


Annie:

What shall we talk about?


Dinshaw:

It’s up to you…


Annie:

Ah! I want to thank you for the roses.


Dinshaw:

Oh yeah darling, yes…


Annie:

Because it is near my anniversary.


Dinshaw:

Yes. They are getting very rare now because of the cold weather.


Annie:

But not as cold as home.


Dinshaw:

In Sweden it is very cold.


Annie:

Oh, terrible!


Dinshaw:

It is fifteen degrees colder than here in England.


Annie:

Ah. And you don’t mind, eh?


Dinshaw:

No, I don’t mind. I like the cold weather better than the warm weather.


-


Annie:

You are still at the same hotel, eh?


Dinshaw:

Yes. The same hotel.


Dinshaw:

That brings back many memories…


Dinshaw:

Yes, of course it does.


Annie:

…for me, you know? 


Dinshaw:

Yes, it does.

Annie:

I think back to those days, you know, when we were together…


Dinshaw:

Such happy times.


Annie:

…and we used to come to Europe and to London and you know, everything.


Dinshaw:

They were such happy times.


Annie:

It is a long time ago.


Dinshaw:

Yeah.


Annie:

And it is to me like yesterday.


Dinshaw:

Yes.


Annie:

And when you are there, you remember and think about us, you know?


Dinshaw:

Yes.


Annie:

But they have made many changes.


Dinshaw:

Oh, yes!


Annie:

It isn't the same as when we were there.


Dinshaw:

Yeah. Nothing is the same.


Annie:

It is very different.


Dinshaw:

Yes.


Annie:

Very different from what I remember it in the old days.


Dinshaw:

Yes, you know even the doors, they have…ah…sort of…ah…fitted them so that they don’t slam.


Annie:

So, that is a good thing.


Dinshaw:

Yeah, because before I remember if your next-door neighbour was not careful it can wake you up in the night.

Annie:

I know! [Laughs] I remember that, too! But now I suppose in a way it is better, I don’t know.


Dinshaw:

Yeah!


Annie:

In regards to the doors slamming, it is better, but eh, I don’t know I think the place is different.


Dinshaw:

Yes. And then they've got new changes: they've got television in every room, and, and ah they get the little hot, uh…


Annie:

And the restaurant.


Dinshaw:

Yes, but, eh, the little hot, uh, kettle.


Annie:

But you don’t go into the restaurant!


Dinshaw:

Yes I do lovey! The same Italian restaurant that is downstairs.


Annie:

But it looks very different to me.


Dinshaw:

Oh, yes!


Annie:

I don’t remember it looking like that.


Dinshaw:

No. There've changed it.


Annie:

It doesn’t look the same at all.


Dinshaw:

No. There've changed it.


Annie:

I suppose in a way they have to make changes.


Dinshaw:

Yeah. Yes.


Annie:

And then there is this other part, too. The smaller part.


Dinshaw:

Yes, yes of course.


Annie:

Coffee?


Dinshaw:

Yes.


Annie:

Coffee place, uh?


Dinshaw:

But now you can make your own coffee in your bedroom.


Annie:

Oh! That’s not very nice idea, do you think?


Dinshaw Nanji:

Yes.


Annie:

Do you do that?


Dinshaw:

Yes! Yes! Because then you do not have to ask for anything. Everything is in your room: the coffee powder, and, and sugar, and milk. And everything is in your room.


Annie:

But I think it is nice to go into the restaurant, eh?


Dinshaw:

Yes.


Annie:

But, uh…having food in the bedroom, huh? Oh! I’m not so sure I like it. But never mind. It isn’t important. As long as you are alright and you are happy. And I think all the time, you know, all those wonderful times we had together.


Dinshaw:

Oh, yes.


Annie:

In London and elsewhere, you know?


Dinshaw:

Yes.


Annie:

I used to enjoy my trips…

Dinshaw:

Yes.

Annie:

…but I too come to London.


Dinshaw:

It’s lovely to look back on, of course…


Annie:

But wasn’t there one other hotel once we stay at in London. Besides that one? If I remember wasn’t there another hotel, once or twice we stay…


Dinshaw:

That’s right yes.


Annie:

…a long time ago.


Dinshaw:

Yes. You’re right.


Annie:

Was that in the Strand too?


Dinshaw:

Uh…we were on the top floor - and you could see half of London from there.

Annie:

Yes, I know. But I have any…I thought there was another hotel…


Dinshaw:

Yes…I, I remember that, but I can’t remember the name of it.


Annie:

No, I can’t remember…


Dinshaw:

Only once we have been there.


Annie:

Yes, that is right. I don’t know why, but I remember once…


Dinshaw:

Yes…


Annie:

…we stay in some different hotel.


Dinshaw:

Yes…


Annie:

…but it isn't important.


Dinshaw:

That was in Leicester Square…


Annie:

Was it Leicester Square?


Dinshaw:

Leicester Square.


Annie:

I think I remember it, but I...not Shaftesbury?

Dinshaw:

Yes.


Annie:

Was it called Shaftesbury?


Dinshaw:

Uh…


Annie:

No. I don’t know. Doesn’t matter.


Dinshaw:

I can’t remember the name of it.


Annie:

It’s not important to talk about hotel. It’s just that because you stay always…for me, you know, you think…


Dinshaw:

Yes, yes.


Annie Nanji:

…of the past...


Dinshaw:

Yes, that’s right.


Annie:

…you know, you stay there - Piccadilly.


Dinshaw:

Yes.


Annie:

And that place in Piccadilly, you know?

Dinshaw:

Yes, yes that’s right.


Annie:

Hello, hello?


Dinshaw:

Yes and Piccadilly is changing all over the place, you know? They are building new buildings and, eh, I wonder if Piccadilly Circus will be the same.


Annie:

I don’t know. But I remember all the happy times we have together…


Dinshaw:

Yes.


Annie:

…when we go round and we go here...


Dinshaw:

Yes. That’s right.


Annie:

...and there, you know, together. We were so close.


Dinshaw:

But you know the back streets round the hotel are still the same and it’s very good. You know the old marketplace and eh, everything is the same as before.


Annie:
I remember we used to go to a market somewhere around the back?


Dinshaw:

Yes.


Annie:

I can’t remember the name of it…


Dinshaw:

Uh…


Annie:

…but there were a lot of interesting little shops…


Dinshaw:

Yes.


Annie:

And also a fruit market...


Dinshaw:
Oh yes!


Annie:
...and everything you know?


Dinshaw:

Oh, yes! Yes, yes! It’s still there.


Annie:

Oh, still there?


Dinshaw:

Yes, it’s still there.


Annie:

And the flowers which you bring today. The roses. They from the market?


Dinshaw:

Yes, they come from market.


-


Annie:

I get very sentimental…


Dinshaw:

Well, I understand it. So do I sometimes…


Annie:

…about you and the past and all the happy things.


Dinshaw:

Yes.


Annie:

We did so much…


Dinshaw:

Yes.


Annie:

…together one way and another…


Dinshaw:

Yes.


Annie:

Hello?


Dinshaw:

Hello darling! Yes.


Annie:

But you are quite happy, uh?


Dinshaw:

Oh yes darling!


Annie:

That is the most important thing for me - I have to know you are happy.


Dinshaw:

While I live, I have to be happy and you’ll know you…


Annie:

I don’t like when you get sad, you know?


Dinshaw:

No, you know…


Annie:

You sometimes sit and be sad and…


Dinshaw:

You know, you make me happy every time I see you.


Annie:

Oh, I look forward so much, you know, to the time…


Dinshaw:

Yes.


Annie:

…when you will come and join me here.


Dinshaw:

Yes.


Annie:

But it seems as if you are too healthy.


Dinshaw:

Well, I don’t know…


Annie:

I’m glad that you are good in your health…


Dinshaw:

Yes.


Annie:

…but I sometimes think I have to wait a good time yet, eh?


Dinshaw:

Yes. I don’t know.


Annie:

I think I would always tell you, you know, when the time comes, I am convinced that you will come very quick.


Dinshaw:

Yes.


Annie:

I think possible in your sleep.


Dinshaw:

In, in my sleep, yes.


Annie:

Possible. I don’t know. I always feel that when it happens it will be quick.


Dinshaw:

You always told me that, 'you will pass over in your sleep' and that too which will be in the early hours of the morning.


Annie Nanji:

Ah! I shall be there waiting for you.


Dinshaw:

[Laughs]


Annie:

I shall be there waiting for you.


Dinshaw:

Yeah.


-


Annie:

Ah, I wish I could come and put my arms around you. I would give anything if it were possible. Of course, I do, but what I mean is, you don’t know.


Dinshaw:

No.


Annie:

I don’t think. But I think sometimes you do feel, and you do sense me...


Dinshaw:

Oh, yes!


Annie:

...being very close to you.


Dinshaw:

I do, especially when I go to sleep, I feel you…


Annie:

Ah, then you are with me most of the time.


Dinshaw:

Yes, very, very close then.


Annie:

But you still get up early.


Dinshaw:

I, I must get up early because…


Annie:

Why so early?


Dinshaw:

Because I am not able to sleep like normal people, eight hours. You see, when you get my age, ah, the total number of sleep hours is half.


Annie:

Well, I don’t know. You have to get up, I suppose, but, eh...I sometimes think, you know, why is he so early?


Dinshaw:

You see if I don’t, don’t sleep then I might just as well get up…


-


Annie:

You know you don’t, eh, how you say, um, my things in the wardrobe.


Dinshaw:

Oh, yes.


Annie:

You still keep.


Dinshaw:

Yes, I have them.


Annie:

Why? Why...


Dinshaw:

Yes, I have them.


Annie:

...for so long?


Dinshaw:

And they’re just the same.


Annie:

I know but, eh…


Dinshaw:

They’re just the same.


Annie:

I…sometimes I wonder why you keep them so long.


Dinshaw:

Well…


Annie:

I know why, of course. But, eh…it seems a pity. Someone could make use them, eh? But you won’t give them away, huh?


Dinshaw:

Yes.


Annie:

No?


Dinshaw:

Huh?


Annie:

[Louder] You won’t give them away?


Dinshaw:

No, no, no, no, no, no…


Annie:

Well, I can’t tell you…ach!


Dinshaw:

They will automatically find the right home when I am gone.


Annie:

You make a will?


Dinshaw:

Yes, yes, I do.


Annie:

Good.


Dinshaw:

Long ago.


Annie:

Ah, what?


Dinshaw:

Long ago.


Annie:

A long one? What’s a long?


Dinshaw:

No, no, I said, 'Long time ago.'


Annie:

Ah!


-


Dinshaw:

Yes. But, ah…I have been told that someone will come along and make me a spontaneous offer to buy the flat as it is, but…


Annie:

Well I don’t see you doing it. I don’t somehow think you will sell it.


Dinshaw:

No…


Annie:

I can’t imagine you moving.


Dinshaw:

No listen…


Annie:

No?


Dinshaw:

…this offer will be that the person who is speculating will occupy it after I am dead.


Annie:

Ah! That is different!


Dinshaw:

Yes, it is.


Annie:

In other words, eh, when you are here…


Dinshaw:

Yes.


Annie:

…then they will take over.


Dinshaw:

Then, yes.


Annie:

But, uh, you have done it now?


Dinshaw:

No, uh…just…


Annie:

If you do it now…


BRIEF DISTORTION IN TAPE


Dinshaw:

Yes…


Annie:

…then you could....the money.


Dinshaw:

Yes.


Annie:

While...on your side, huh?

Dinshaw:

Yes, that’s right.


Annie:

And then they take over when you come here.


Dinshaw:

Yes, that’s right.


Annie:

And if you do it now, that means you will have some income from it.


Dinshaw:

Exactly.


Annie:

Why don’t you do it? It is a marvelous idea!


Dinshaw:

Yes, but…


Annie:

And then you have benefit from it.


Dinshaw:

Yes, but it’s a spontaneous offer that must come without my asking for it.


Annie:

Huh? I don’t understand.


Dinshaw:

It's a spontaneous offer, that somebody likes your flat and says, 'I would like to live in here.' Er…


Annie:

But you would have to do it legally.


Dinshaw:

Yes.


Annie:

Huh?


Dinshaw:

Oh yes. Legally you can do it because I sell it with the furniture and everything in it.


Annie:

Well, I don’t know. All I know is that it might be a very good idea. I think you should get good advice on it.


Dinshaw:

Well…


Annie:

You know, someone to talk to about it?


Dinshaw:

I have, but…it, it has to be done uh, spontaneously, that is...uh, someone must fall in love with it.


Annie:

Huh?


Dinshaw:

Somebody must fall in love with your apartment to be able to bring this about. And, uh, I think it will be done from the other side.


Annie:

Well maybe - but I am in love with you!


Dinshaw:

Yes, I know. But, eh, this person will be in love with the apartment.


Annie:

Not you?


Dinshaw:

No. Not me.

Annie:

Good!


Dinshaw:

Hmm…


Annie:

[Laughing] I don’t want you to fall in love with anyone!


Dinshaw:

No, no…


Annie:

I am teasing you.


Dinshaw:

That’s right, I know.


Annie:

You understand? I am teasing you.


Dinshaw:

So, you’ll send me a speculant who will...


Annie:

What did you say?


Dinshaw:

I said, you’ll send me a speculant who will...


Annie:

Oh I don’t know about that. I don’t know.


Dinshaw:

Yes.


Annie:

I will try if it is possible...but...then how will people know about it? They will have to come and see it.


Dinshaw:

Well, of course, a lot of people have...have been in the flat who have looked at it and they talk, one to the other. And it's a nice flat.


Annie:

Oh, the flat is all right, eh…I, I don’t think you should have any problem in selling it…


Dinshaw:

No, no.


Annie:

Providing you get the right person, you know?


Dinshaw:

That is why I say…


Annie:

After all, you would not want to sell it to anyone…


Dinshaw:

No. That is why I say, if you send me the right person…


Annie:

And would they have to be responsible for everything?


Dinshaw:

Oh, yes. That'll be done legally then.


Annie:

Good.


Dinshaw:

So you send me the right person?


Annie:

[Laughing] Well I don't know. I cannot promise. But, I will see what I can do. But it’s not so easy.


Dinshaw:

Hmm…


-


Annie:

Why do you still go to the cemetery?


Dinshaw:

Well darling, how can I pass your birthday without my…


Annie:

I appreciate it, but I’m not there! I’m not there!


Dinshaw:

No, no, I know that!


Annie:

And, uh, I see you go there and it makes you depressed.


Dinshaw:

Yeah I - no, no, I am not depressed darling.


Annie:

No?


Dinshaw:

No, no, no. I am not depressed.


Annie:

And the flowers.


Dinshaw:

But the fact that I have cleaned it up and...and I put the bushes round…


Annie:

I know. I see you. I watch you do it and I think...


Dinshaw:

Yes. I was there, I was there a week ago.


Annie:

The only time I am in the cemetery is when you go there.


Dinshaw:

Yes, yes.


Annie:

[Laughing] And I should look forward to the time when you are there, at least in a way, because you will be with me. But you know you still have got to get the date right.


-


Dinshaw:

Yes. Do you know it was very funny. About a week ago, I saw a picture on the television about the cemetery in Paris.


Annie:

Ah, Père Lachaise...


Dinshaw:

And it was…the statues there. They were living statues.


Annie:

Living statues?

Dinshaw:

Living statues. Means, people who existed in real life. And it was full of it. And there, people believe that the people who have died are still living there in their graves.


Annie:

Oh, how silly.


Dinshaw:

And I thought to myself, 'How funny. How ignorant people are.'


Annie:

How do you mean living?


Dinshaw:

Um?


Annie:

How do you mean living there?


Dinshaw:

Oh, they think that they live there and, and, and, uh, uh, they believe that they are not dead.


Annie:

I don't understand it…


Dinshaw:

Yeah…


Annie:

But I am living, but I am not living in the cemetery.


Dinshaw:

No.


Annie:

I come, I live with you best part of the time.


Dinshaw:

But they have no knowledge of spiritual existence.


Annie:

No? Oh, they are ignorant.


Dinshaw:
Yes. They are Roman Catholic you see?


Annie:

I see. Uh! I feel sorry for them.


Dinshaw:

Yes.


Annie:

I feel sorry for anyone who does not believe, you know.


Dinshaw:

Yes.


Annie:

We are very fortunate.


Dinshaw:

But darling, look at your mother…


Annie:

You and I are very fortunate people! We know about this. We are together. And you know, I can talk to you occasionally…


Dinshaw:

Yes.


Annie:

…like this…


Dinshaw:

Yes.


Annie:

And I am with you in the home...


Dinshaw:

Yeah…


Annie:

…in the flat, you know? And, uh! I just look forward to the time when you join me.


-


Dinshaw:

But, mind you, look at your mother, eh…


Annie:

Ach! Mama.


Dinshaw:

She didn’t believe in it. How, how can the children believe it? And how can she…


Annie:

Well, Mama was of the old school.


Dinshaw:

Eh?


Annie:

She could not get away from the old ideas.


Dinshaw:

No, but she is better…


Annie:

But she is alright now. She understands. But you know, I see her a great deal, but I am not actually with her, but I see her from time to time.


Dinshaw:

Is she with your father [Sammi]?


Annie:

Oh yes, she is with the family.


Dinshaw:

Yeah.


Annie:

But, you know, I don’t know if I should say this…


Dinshaw:

Ah…


Annie:

…but, uh, we did not always agree, Mama and me.


Dinshaw:

Hmm…


Annie:

You know?


Dinshaw:

Yes.


Annie:

We did not always agree.


-


Dinshaw:

No. No, naturally, if you’re biased, uh, about, uh…about a subject…but in Sweden, even now there are quite a lot of people who don’t believe in Spiritualism.


Annie:

I think there must be people. I sometimes wish it were possible for you to meet different people. There must be people there…


Dinshaw:

There should be a society or something or…


Annie:

Is there nothing? Nothing at all?


Dinshaw:

No, no. Nothing at all.


Annie:

Ach! But I don’t understand. There must be people who are very deeply interested…


Dinshaw:

People live their life through like that and then, of course, they learn nothing.


Annie:

I don’t know, it is a pity. I think if everyone understood this…


Dinshaw:

Yes.


Annie:

…it would make such a big difference, you know, to them in their attitude and life, you know.


-


Dinshaw:

I am very anxious that, that book of ours will soon come out. And…


Annie:

When do you think this will be?


Dinshaw:

Well darling, it takes…

Annie:

Is this man going to do it?


Dinshaw:

Yes. I talked to him yesterday…


Annie:

Uh-huh…


Dinshaw:

…and he is making preparations. And, uh, but it takes time, ah…


Annie:

But has he not started?


Dinshaw:

Yes, yes, he has started.


Annie:

Oh, good.


Dinshaw:

But now, ah, his trouble is that, ah, in, in England, the cost of publishing a psychic book has risen astronomically, you see? And, uh, uh, in America it is cheaper than, uh, it is here.


Annie:

But I think if it good - if it is...you know; I think he will get a publisher.


Dinshaw:

Oh yes, yes. He'll get it published. Yes.


Annie:

The publisher pays for it not you...you don’t have to pay for it.


Dinshaw:

No, no, no, no! But he told me yesterday he is working hard and he hopes by the next time I come, ah, he will have some definite news.


Annie:

I hope so.


Dinshaw:

It doesn’t take long for the book, eh, to be printed.


Annie:

No…


Dinshaw:

But, you know, the cost of printing here has gone up not once, twice, but five times more than it used to cost.


Annie:

Well, I see…


Dinshaw:

And, uh, of course that is...and then on top of it, there are not many books sold.


Annie:

No?


Dinshaw:

Look at Leslie’s book. It didn’t get the reception, uh, he ex…he expected because it was something beyond the, uh…


Annie:

It is limited, eh? I suppose so. I don’t know. I don’t know much about it, if anything…but I would like for you and me for the book to come out.


Dinshaw:

But he was...he was telling me that the book, uh, he wrote it on ah, ah, ah, Leslie’s uh, different tapes, 'Life After Death'...the number of copies sold is over 100,000 now.


Annie:

As many as that?


Dinshaw:

Yes.


Annie:

Goodness me! That is very good!


Dinshaw:

Yes. So, he hopes...I said that this should be ten times more than that. [Laughs]


Annie:

Well, I don’t know. [Laughing] I don’t know what would you call it?


Dinshaw:

Well…you’ll have to give me the title.


Annie:

Ah. That is an idea. I must think about it.


Dinshaw:

Yes, please think about it and give me the right title. The Angel from Afar!


Annie:

Oh I don’t think that would do! (Laughing) I am not an angel.


Dinshaw:

You are!


Annie:

I don’t think of myself and no one should think of anyone as an angel. What is an angel, anyway? I am the same person in many ways. You know, I have changed, of course, obviously.


Dinshaw:

Of course.


Annie:

Because how can one not change one’s thoughts and attitudes when you are in a condition of life which is so different to the earth. But, I am not an angel. I am just...well, just me.


Dinshaw:

Well, you see…


Annie:

And, and I am no...not different in all that way, you know, from my old self.


Dinshaw:

The very fact that you come and go…


Annie:

And the fact that I still love you and will continue to love you and nothing will ever come between us.


Dinshaw:

That’s right.


Annie:

And our love will make all things possible.


Dinshaw:
Yes, yes.


Annie:

Love overcomes all things.


Dinshaw:

Yes.


Annie:

Ah!


-


Dinshaw:

But, uh, I was saying that the world is in such a terrible state, that people don’t realise what is right and what is wrong, you see. No matter where you look and, eh, unless people are connected, eh, to their spiritual, eh, brain, eh, things won’t get better.


Annie:

Ah. I don’t know. It is very difficult for people to understand I think, in your world.


Dinshaw:

Yes, very difficult.


Annie:

You know, the one thing that is important above all else is love.


Dinshaw:

Hmm…


Annie:

It is love that makes things possible.


Dinshaw:

Yes.


Annie:

It is love that overcomes all things.


Dinshaw:

But you see, love has got many meanings.


Annie:

Oh, there are many kinds of love! But, eh, ours is an all-embracing love.


Dinshaw:

Yeah.


Annie:

Is something that sustains us and gives us strength.


Dinshaw:

Yeah.


Annie:

And it is my love and your love that makes possible my coming to talk to you.


Dinshaw:

Exactly!


Annie:

If people only would realise…


Dinshaw:

Yes.


Annie:

…that there’s nothing that can happen to a person untoward - you know, bad - where love is. Because love will overcome all things, you know?


Dinshaw:

Yes, yes.


Annie:

It is love that makes it possible for me to come to you.


Dinshaw:

I know.


-


Annie:

When are you coming to talk to me again, uh?


Dinshaw:

Uh, on the day after tomorrow.


Annie:

Ah, I look forward to that and I will bring the children.


Dinshaw:

That, that is your birthday, you know on the 19th!


Annie:

I know, I know, I know! I tell you!


Dinshaw:

You will be 70 years!


Annie:

But I will talk to you then and I will bring the children.


Dinshaw:

You will be 70 years then.


Annie:

I have to go in a minute...


Dinshaw:

Oh, no…


Annie:

…but I want you to know that I am doing everything I can, you know?


Dinshaw:

Yeah.


Annie:

You must always realise it.


Dinshaw:

Yes.


Annie:

And I love you and always remember it. And I will come and talk to you soon again, uh?


Dinshaw:

But, don’t be in a hurry to go darling.


Annie:

I can’t hold on.


Dinshaw:

Oh, yes.


Annie:

The power, it is going…


Dinshaw:

Yes.


Annie:

…whatever it is that happens, you know? It is very difficult, you know?


Dinshaw:

Yeah.


Annie:

I do pretty good, as you say, eh?


Dinshaw:

Beg pardon?


Annie:

I do alright!


Dinshaw:

Yes, yes, yes.


Annie:

I love you!


Dinshaw:

Yes.


Annie:

I have to go.


Dinshaw:

Okay darling.


Annie:

I see you soon. Goodbye.


Dinshaw:

Goodbye darling.


Annie:

But it isn’t goodbye, is it?


Dinshaw:

No.


Annie:

It is au revoir.


Dinshaw:

Oh, yeah.



END OF RECORDING


This transcript was kindly created for the Trust by Mary Beth Spann Mank in October 2017